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One of the problems I am having with c# is that there seems to be so much information online that I am having trouble finding the right answer to the most basic of questions.

I am trying to do something simple: I have a button, I click it, it queries the database and populates a datagrid on my windows form.

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    { 
        SqlConnection c = new SqlConnection("Data Source = (local); Integrated Security = true; Initial Catalog = pubs;  "); 

        c.Open();
        // 2
        // Create new DataAdapter
        SqlCommand cmd = c.CreateCommand();
        cmd.CommandText = @" SELECT * FROM Authors ";
        SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

        dataGridView1.DataSource = reader;
        dataGridView1.DataBind();
    }

Error 1 'System.Windows.Forms.DataGridView' does not contain a definition for 'DataBind' and no extension method 'DataBind' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Windows.Forms.DataGridView' could be found.....

I am probably missing a "using directive" but which one? Multiple Google searches tell me how to bind a Yahoo RSS Feed to a gridview or provide various obscure details on "using directives".

Maybe I am using the SqlDataReader incorrectly. Should I be using SqlAdapter instead? What happened to all the good basic tutorials online for windows c# forms? A few months ago I found a couple great tutorials, but they seem to have lost their pageranking and I cannot find them anymore using basic google searches.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("your connection string"))
{
    conn.Open();
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(@"SELECT * FROM Authors", conn))
    {
        using (SqlDataAdapter adap = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd))
        {
            DataTable dt = new DataTable();
            adap.Fill(dt);
            dataGridView1.DataSource = dt;
        }
    }
}

The DataGridView does not have a DataBind() method because it doesn't need one. Setting the DataSource property handles the binding for you. The using() blocks will automatically close and dispose of everything for you as well.

Note: you should replace "your connection string" with a valid connection string. I left yours out of my sample to avoid the horizontal scrollbars, and I'm not sure yours is valid anyway. You may get a runtime error when you run the code using your connection string. www.connectionstrings.com is a great resource for figuring out a valid connection string.

Update: instead of the nested using() blocks, you can also do it like this:

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("..."))
using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(@" SELECT * FROM Authors", conn))
using (SqlDataAdapter adap = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd))
{
    conn.Open();
    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
    adap.Fill(dt);
    dataGridView1.DataSource = dt;
}

I prefer the nested style, but it's "half of one, six dozen of the other" to me. Typically, I would encapsulate code like this into a class (called "DataGetter" or whatever) with a static method like:

public static DataTable GetData(string query)
{
    // do all the connecting and adapting and filling and so forth
}

so that the code in your button click would be as simple as:

dataGridView1.DataSource = DataGetter.GetData("SELECT * FROM AUTHORS");

However, I would not do this in any performance-critical section of my code, since you sometimes want to keep a SqlCommand object (and its SqlParameter collection) around between calls. You do not need to keep SqlConnection objects around between calls, thanks to connection pooling (in fact, you don't want to keep them around under any circumstances).

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Thank you, that is the syntax I was looking for but had trouble finding through searching on google. Is it common practice to nest the "Using" statements like that? –  CsharpFused Sep 19 '09 at 23:46
    
It's common practice for me, but you can also do it like in my update. –  MusiGenesis Sep 20 '09 at 0:06
    
Thank you, this helped a lot and the datagrid is working now. Bookmarked it for future reference. –  CsharpFused Sep 20 '09 at 0:28
    
In your 2nd example, you "use" an SqlConnection, an SqlCommand, and then an SqlDataAdapter. Since the SqlDataAdapter contains its own SqlCommand, I typically omit the SqlCommand when using the SqlDataAdapter which gives the added benefit of not having to manage the SqlConnection State. Would there be a reason for using the SqlCommand object specifically for this case, or are you simply trying to provide a complete example? Just curious. –  jp2code Apr 11 '11 at 19:53
    
@jp2code: the ADO.NET architects were big fans of constructor overloads, so there are often many different ways of writing code to perform a given task (that all end up doing exactly the same thing under the hood). In general, I prefer to explicitly spell out the steps involved in something - in fact, I had to stop myself from putting conn.Close() in my examples. :) –  MusiGenesis Apr 11 '11 at 21:18
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You're not missing a using directive; it's just that the WinForms DataGridView doesn't have a DataBind method. Just assigning DataSource is enough to get the binding to happen; you don't need to call a method as well.

However, I don't think you can assign a SqlDataReader as the DataSource. According to the DataSource property documentation in MSDN, the DataSource must be an IList, an IListSource, an IBindingList or an IBindingListView. You will probably instead need to load the data into a DataTable or DataSet (or an object data source populated using an object-relational mapper), and use that as the DataSource.

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Okay, so I should use "SqlDataAdapter"? How do I bind the dataset to the datagrid? –  CsharpFused Sep 19 '09 at 23:35
    
Yes. Per MusiGenesis' comment, use SqlDataAdapter to load the DataTable or DataSet, then bind by setting the DataSource property to the DataTable or DataSet. –  itowlson Sep 19 '09 at 23:39
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