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I though setting up a veritable len with strlen() function to find the last char, print it, and then decrement it by 1. It is not working in my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define SIZE 4
int main(void)

{
    int index;
    char wordToPrint[SIZE];
    printf("please enter a random word:\n");
    for (index = 0; index < SIZE; index++)
    {
        scanf("%c", &wordToPrint[index]);
    }

    int len = strlen(wordToPrint);
    for (index = 0; index < SIZE; index++)
    {
        printf("%c", wordToPrint[len]);
        --len;
    }

    return 0;
}

input is "nir"

output is:

??
r

What is wrong in the last block?

tnx

share|improve this question
    
what is input and what is output generated ..? – Sumit Singh Jan 24 '13 at 9:26
    
"it is not working" is the best error description you can come up with?! – Kerrek SB Jan 24 '13 at 9:27
    
@KerrekSB sorry, edited i/o. – Nir Jan 24 '13 at 9:34

10 Answers 10

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Take a look for following code :

end = strlen(wordToPrint) - 1;
for (x = end; x >= 0; --x) {
    printf("%c", wordToPrint[x]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@SumitSungh thanks allot, got it :) can you tell me why is it printing me also the 'enter' char? "?rin" – Nir Jan 24 '13 at 9:44

C arrays index from zero.

Think about how this affects the relationship between the length of a string, and the index of the last character.

Also, your way of reading in the word is very strange, it should just be:

scanf("%s", wordToPrint);

or, better:

fgets(wordToPrint, sizeof wordToPrint, stdin);

There's no need to loop and read a character at a time. The above will give you different lengths depending on the amount of input.

The second suggestion will not stop at whitespace though, so if you go with that you should probably replace word with line for clarity.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! understood :) @unwid – Nir Jan 24 '13 at 9:43

Reverse iteration needs to be offset by one:

Forward:

for (size_t i = 0; i != N; ++i) { putchar(word[i]); }

Backward:

for (size_t i = 0; i != N; ++i) { putchar(word[N - i - 1]); }
//                                                  ^^^^

This is because an array of length N has valid indices in the range [0, N).

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, got it. – Nir Jan 24 '13 at 10:23

In addition to what other posters are saying, you should probably consider giving and extra byte to the string:

char wordToPrint[SIZE + 1];

and then set

wordToPrint[4] = '\0';

In the case that someone inputs a 4 letter word (such as 'blue') your string will look like { 'b', 'l', 'u', 'e' } but with no room for a null character.

Strlen and other functions rely on finding a null value at the end.

share|improve this answer
int len = strlen(wordToPrint);
for (index = 0; index < SIZE; index++)
{
    printf("%c", wordToPrint[len]);
    --len;
}

return 0;

suppose you have word otto so int len = strlen(wordToPrint); will set len to 4, but when you use it in printf("%c", wordToPrint[len]); your array is getting out of bound wordToPrint[4] where as the last index in array is wordToPrint[3] as it starts from 0 index

share|improve this answer

write your code like this because at wordToPrint[len], len is the +1 then the last index of the wordToPrint[] array so its showing garbadge/null value

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define SIZE 4
int main(void)

{
    int index;
    char wordToPrint[SIZE];
    printf("please enter a random word:\n");
    for (index = 0; index < SIZE; index++)
    {
        scanf("%c", &wordToPrint[index]);
    }

    int len = strlen(wordToPrint);
    for (index = 0; index < SIZE; index++)
    {
        --len;
        printf("%c", wordToPrint[len-1]);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

This is the whole program, for your question.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char *strrev(char *); // Prototype

/* The following function is by me, to reverse a string, because strrev is not available in GCC */

char *strrev(char *str)
{
      char *p1, *p2;

      if (! str || ! *str)
            return str;
      for (p1 = str, p2 = str + strlen(str) - 1; p2 > p1; ++p1, --p2)
      {
            *p1 ^= *p2;
            *p2 ^= *p1;
            *p1 ^= *p2;
      }
      return str;
}

/*================================================================Begin Main======================================================================================*/

int main()
{
    char sentence[100], rev_sentence[100], c;

    int j = 0, i = 0, m = 0;

    sentence[i] = ' ';                 // The first char in the sentence should be a space to reverse this first word
    i++;
    printf("Enter a sentence : ");
    while((c = getchar()) != '\n')
    {
        sentence[i] = c;
        i++;
    }
    sentence[i] = '\0';


    printf("Reversed word is: ");


    for(i = strlen(sentence) - 1 ; i >= 0; i = i - 1)
    {
         if(sentence[i] == ' ')
        {
            rev_sentence[j] = '\0'; // because strrev fun reverses string ntil it encounters a first \0 character
            strrev(rev_sentence);
            printf("%s ", rev_sentence);
            for(m = 0; m < 100; m++)
            rev_sentence[m] = 0;
            j = 0;
            continue;
        }
        rev_sentence[j] = sentence[i];
        j++;
    }

    rev_sentence[j] = '\0';

}

This program reverses entire sentence, or a word if u enter just 1 word and press enter, hope u like it and understand it

share|improve this answer

This code is wrong:

int len = strlen(wordToPrint);
for (index = 0; index < SIZE; index++)
{
    printf("%c", wordToPrint[len]);
    --len;
}

Its printing chars from 4 to 1 but you want to print chars from 3 to 0.

You should do it this way:

for (index = len - 1; index >= 0; index--)
    printf("%c", wordToPrint[index ]);
share|improve this answer

In addition to the other answers, why use strlen() when you know that the word has SIZE chars?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm guessing his point was to give a max length, so "tar" is still a valid input – h4lc0n Jan 24 '13 at 9:38
    
Yes, but then the input loop has also a problem. And there is no null character at the end of the string to apply strlen(). – anumi Jan 24 '13 at 9:41
    
Agreed, already answered about that problem – h4lc0n Jan 24 '13 at 9:43

Here is a working code based on the posted one:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define SIZE 4
int main(void)

{
int index;
char wordToPrint[SIZE];
printf("please enter a random word:\n");
//Why you need a loop to read a word?
//for (index = 0; index < SIZE; index++)
//{
//    scanf("%c", &wordToPrint[index]);
//}

scanf("%s",wordToPrint);

int len = strlen(wordToPrint);

//Modify the loop like this:
for (index = len; index >= 0 ; index--)
{
    printf("%c", wordToPrint[len]);  
}
printf("\n");//Add this line for clearing the stdout buffer and a more readable output.
return 0;
}

Note: its always a good practice to memset() or bzero() the array before using it.

share|improve this answer

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