Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using some static UITableViewCell's configured in the Storyboard to display some setting information.

Some of the other cells should be disabled if one of the other settings is toggled off.

In order to put the cells into the proper state, during viewWillAppear I read the settings from NSUserDefaults and then change the cells accordingly.

- (void) viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
    if ([[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] boolForKey:@"OtherCellEnabled"]) {
            [self otherCell].alpha = 1.0;
            [self otherCell].userInteractionEnabled = YES;
        }
        else {
            NSLog(@"Changing alpha to 0.3");
            [self otherCell].alpha = 0.3;
            [self otherCell].userInteractionEnabled = NO;
        }

The problem is that when I actually run the program, even though it says in the log that the alpha is changed, the alpha doesn't actually change. The userInteractionEnabled does seem to stick, but the alpha is left at 1.0.

It's not a problem of cell reuse, or cell's not being instantiated in time, because the other settings can be changed just fine.

Changing it from cell.alpha to cell.contentView.alpha works, but that is a different setting.

It seems like all of the settings "stick" except for the alpha setting, which somehow is getting overwritten.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried [cell setNeedsDisplay]; ? –  Ivan Alek Jan 24 '13 at 10:20
    
As I said, if I actually print the cell.alpha once the table is all done loading, it is set to the incorrect value of 1.0. So the value isn't even being saved. If I do things like change the color, they do get saved, so I don't think it's a drawing problem. –  divergio Jan 24 '13 at 10:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I am answering my own question because I was able to solve it.

First, I tried putting the alpha change in cellForRowAtIndexPath, but that didn't work either. After a lot of tinkering, I've come to the conclusion that UITableViewCell's alpha setting is somehow special in that it keeps getting overwritten or set to 1.0.

I found two fixes:

First, instead of doing the change in cellForRowAtIndexPath, do it in the UITableViewDelegate method willDisplayCell. For whatever reason, changing the cell's alpha in this method will actually stick. Of course, if you do it this way you have to re-arrange your logic so that the changes are done on a cell-by-cell basis, i.e.:

- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView willDisplayCell:(UITableViewCell *)cell  
                                         forRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
if (cell == [self otherCell]) {
    if ([[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] boolForKey:@"OtherCellEnabled"]) {
        cell.alpha = 1.0;
        cell.userInteractionEnabled = YES;
    }
    else {
        NSLog(@"Changing alpha to 0.3");
        cell.alpha = 0.3;
        cell.userInteractionEnabled = NO;
    }
}
}

As I said, I'm not sure exactly why this works in willDisplayCell but not in cellForRowAtIndexPath. Others seem uncertain also:

What is -[UITableViewDelegate willDisplayCell:forRowAtIndexPath:] for?

UITableView background with alpha color causing problem with UITableViewCell

The other solution is to, instead of using the problematic alpha, use another setting which will achieve the same affect. In my case, that was the contentView.alpha and the backgroundColor. For whatever reason, these settings will stick, and you can even set them in viewWillAppear and it will work as expected:

- (void) viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated {
    if ([[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] boolForKey:@"OtherCellEnabled"]) {
            [self otherCell].backgroundColor = [UIColor colorWithRed:1.0 green:1.0 blue:1.0 alpha:1.0];
            [self otherCell].contentView.alpha = 1.0;
            [self otherCell].userInteractionEnabled = YES;
        }
        else {
            NSLog(@"Changing alpha to 0.3");
            [self otherCell].backgroundColor = [UIColor colorWithRed:1.0 green:1.0 blue:1.0 alpha:0.3];
            [self otherCell].contentView.alpha = 0.3;
            [self otherCell].userInteractionEnabled = NO;
        }
}

The disadvantage to the second approach is that now you are overwriting the Storyboard's cell color settings, but you could work around that by asking the storyboard for the color if you care about that.

I'm not sure why cell.alpha is treated differently. Maybe something about the way static cells are implemented.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For finding your own answer and posting it! –  Jacco Jan 24 '13 at 19:08

You could try to hint the cell should be redrawn after your if { .. } else { .. }, by using setNeedsDisplay:

[self otherCell setNeedsDisplay]

Based on your comment, how do you get to otherCell? Is this a post that might help?

share|improve this answer
    
It's not a question of the cell drawing or not. If I actually print the alpha value when it is done drawing the alpha value is left at 1.0. –  divergio Jan 24 '13 at 10:31
    
These were static cells, so otherCell is just an IBOutlet I hooked up in the Storyboard. That post wasn't the problem, either, because all the other things about the cell change (like userInteractionEnabled). The cell I'm getting from cellForRowAtIndexPath is the correct cell, just the alpha gets reset somewhere between getting dequeued and being displayed. –  divergio Jan 24 '13 at 18:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.