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#include "/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6/include/omp.h"
#include <iostream>
#include<list>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    list<int> lst;
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
        lst.push_back(i);

#pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        cout<<i<<" "<<omp_get_thread_num()<<endl;
    }   
}

suppose that I can get this:

0  0
1  0
2  0
3  1
4  1

However, sometimes I can get this result:

30  0
1  0
2  0
  1
4  1

or even this kind of result:

30 1 0
4 1

1 0
2 0

I know this is because the output code:

cout<<i<<" "<<omp_get_thread_num()<<endl;

has been spliced into small segments and has no order when doing output. But who can tell me how to prevent this from happening? Thanks.

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1  
"But who can tell me how to prevent this from happening? " - don't parallelize it if you want sequential output! –  Pubby Jan 24 '13 at 10:25
2  
Anyway, POSIX-compliant printf is atomic and so you could use that. –  Pubby Jan 24 '13 at 10:28
    
what if I really need to execute several statements each time? How can I make sure they are not interrupt, and I need them to be running on two-core processor? –  Terry Jan 24 '13 at 10:38
    
I mean, how to make several statements as an atomic? –  Terry Jan 24 '13 at 10:41
1  
@Terry: You can use locks, or use #pragma omp atomic or #pragma omp critical. –  phresnel Jan 24 '13 at 10:47
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code

#pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        cout << i << " " << omp_get_thread_num() << endl;
    }

is equivalent to

#pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        cout << i;
        cout << " ";
        cout << omp_get_thread_num();
        cout << endl;
    }

Calls to << in the different threads may be executed in any order. For instance cout << i; in thread 3 may be followed by cout << i; in tread 0 which may be followed by cout << " "; in thread 3 etc. resulting in the garbled output 30 ....

The correct way is to rewrite the code so that each thread calls cout << only once in the loop:

#pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        stringstream ss;
        ss << i << " " << omp_get_thread_num() << '\n';
        cout << ss.str();
    }   
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Standard output streams are NOT synchronized!

The only guarantee the standard gives is that, single characters are outputted atomically.

You need either a lock - which defies the point of parallelization or you could drop the "<< i" which should result in a quasi synchronized behavior.

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can you give more details on how to give it a lock? Thanks. –  Terry Jan 24 '13 at 10:42
    
@Terry: This wasn't part of the question; you should grab your OpenMP documentation, open up your search engine of choice, and/or study multi threading techniques. If you don't have the slightest clue about multithreading, than please don't (yet); save yourself and your colleagues the pain of debugging parallel code in imperative programming languages. –  phresnel Jan 24 '13 at 10:50
    
Standard output streams are synchronized. Each call to << and >> is atomic. The problem is that in the loop there are 4 calls to <<. –  user763305 Jan 24 '13 at 12:44
    
@user763305: The standard only guarantees that concurrent calls to operator<< don't lead to a data race (aka you won't corrupt the internal state of the stream). They explicitly mention that preventing interleaved output is up to the user (§27.4.1.4) –  MFH Jan 24 '13 at 20:34
    
@MFH: operator<< starts by constructing a sentry object (§27.7.3.6.1). With Visual Studio, the sentry constructor locks a mutex that protects the streambuffer. That seems indeed to be allowed but not required by the standard (§27.7.3.4 and note 325). –  user763305 Jan 24 '13 at 21:05
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The loop runs out of order. This is why you have unordered output.

If your problem is the 30 in

30  0
1  0
2  0
 1
4  1

then stay cool, there is no 30, but 3 and 0. You still have, as expected, an unordered row of [0..4]:

3 0  0
1  0
2  0
 1
4  1

What you can't tell is only which of the 0s which of the 1s is not a thread number.

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You can create an array (of size 5) containing which thread handled which index and then print it outside the parallel loop.

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