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In working on Kira3, I was playing around with the C++ compiler and looking for a good way of implement Kira's duck typing. I was hoping (as it has been a few years of direct C++ programming) that I could use multiple inheritance for member access under multiple types. Alas, I have failed so far...

The ideal code would look like:

class WithX { public: int x; };
class WithY { public: int y; };
class WithZ { public: int z; };

class Point2D : public WithX, public WithY { };
class Point3D : public WithZ, public WithX, public WithY { };

void ZeroOut(Point2D * p) { p->x = 0; p->y = 0; };

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Point3D* p = new Point3D();
    p->x = 1;
    p->y = 1;
    p->z = 1;
    ZeroOut(p);
    return 0;
}

However, it throws a typing error at the invocation of ZeroOut(p). This is ultra sad face. I can force it work by creating a type tower. In the above example, I could change class Point3D : public WithZ, public WithX, public WithY { }; to class Point3D : public Point2D, public WithZ { };

The problem now is when I have structures that overlap. I would either throw an error that would be a pain to solve in kira code, or I have the compiler do something different. I tried

class Point3D : public Point2D, public WithZ, public WithX, public WithY { };

with the hope of the compiler combining them, but this gives ambiguous access to member variables. This can be fixed by replicating writes to the ambiguous member variables, and this could be a solution during my compilation phase. This solution requires more memory.

Any ideas how to solve this without a memory loss?

Or, is there a way to cast variables to multiple types? like

(WithX,WithY *)p
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Thanks everyone! Two good ideas in one question! –  MathGladiator Sep 20 '09 at 1:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I tried ... with the hope of the compiler combining them, but this gives ambiguous access to member variables.

To solve that problem, try virtual inheritance.

share|improve this answer
    
Compile Error: 'virtual' not permitted on data declarations. How does one 'virtual' data? This idea intrigues me. I could use accessors, but that gives a performance hit. –  MathGladiator Sep 20 '09 at 0:51
    
Read the Wikipedia article or Google for 'C++ virtual inheritance' -- you use the virtual keyword when you declare the base class (not when you declare the data member), e.g. class Point2D : public virtual WithX, public virtual WithY {}, etc., to ensure that there's eventually no more than one instance of each base class even though you have a so-called "diamond inheritance tree". –  ChrisW Sep 20 '09 at 1:06
    
Bingo! worked great. –  MathGladiator Sep 20 '09 at 1:09
    
Sweet! solves my pointer casting problem too. –  MathGladiator Sep 20 '09 at 1:12

I don't know anything about Kira, but you could solve at least this particular issue with a template function -- which is kind of like compile-time duck typing, in a way.

#include <iostream>
class WithX { public: int x; };
class WithY { public: int y; };
class WithZ { public: int z; };

class Point2D : public WithX, public WithY { };
class Point3D : public WithZ, public WithX, public WithY { };

// As long as we pass in a type that has an x and a y member,
// ZeroOut will compile and run correctly, setting x and y to zero.
template <typename T>  
void ZeroOut(T * p) { p->x = 0; p->y = 0; };

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Point3D* p = new Point3D();
    p->x = 1;
    p->y = 1;
    p->z = 1;
    ZeroOut(p);
    std::cout << p->x << " " << p->y << " " << p->z << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

correctly outputting:

$ ./a.out
0 0 1

You mentioned in a comment that is uses more code -- I'd like to point out that the added code is negligible. I changed the main function to:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Point3D* p = new Point3D();
    p->x = 1;
    p->y = 1;
    p->z = 1;
    ZeroOut(p);
#ifdef USE_2D
    Point2D *q = new Point2D();
    q->x = 1;
    q->y = 1;
    ZeroOut(q);
#endif
    std::cout << p->x << " " << p->y << " " << p->z << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

and compiling this way gives:

$ g++ p.cpp -o just3
$ g++ p.cpp -DUSE_2D -o 3and2
$ wc -c *3*
 9949 3and2
 9908 just3
19857 total

Are you really going to split hairs over a 41 byte difference in the executable? Well, if you are, just turn on optimization:

$ g++ -O2 p.cpp -o just3
$ g++ -O2 p.cpp -DUSE_2D -o 3and2
$ wc -c *3*
 9882 3and2
 9882 just3
19764 total
share|improve this answer
    
It adds more code, but I was thinking about overloading it myself. I like the template solution as it lets the C++ compiler figure out what types are needed. –  MathGladiator Sep 20 '09 at 0:49
    
I was going to overload myself which creates a lot of stuff versus the template solution where C++ creates the code on demand rather than optimizing it out later (which is cool). –  MathGladiator Sep 20 '09 at 1:03

Overload zeroout?

void ZeroOut(Point2D * p) { p->x = 0; p->y = 0; };
void ZeroOut(Point3D * p) { /* whatever you want*/ };
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 In the original code ZeroOut didn't zero out a Point3D anyway, so the compiler actually caught a logic bug in the code. –  UncleBens Sep 20 '09 at 8:33

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