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I´ve read the Apple documentation about @synchronized and about NSManagedObjectContext but I dont see the things clear at all.

Could anyone explain me the differences between this two pieces of code:

Here we have a critical section in which we do a query to a NSManagedObjectConext

    @synchronized(self) {
        array = [mainContext executeFetchRequest:request error:&error];
        if (error != nil) {
            NSLog(@"Obj list fetch error: %@", error);
            exit(-1);
        }
    }

and here, we do the same query in a locked NSManagedObjectConext

    [mainContext lock];
        array = [mainContext executeFetchRequest:request error:&error];
        if (error != nil) {
            NSLog(@"Obj list fetch error: %@", error);
            exit(-1);
        }

    [mainContext unlock];

What are the implications of each block of code? Which one is the correct one?

Thanks a lot, Im a bit confused.

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The first piece of code is locking the object in which you are running the code, the second piece of code is locking the managed object context. If you use the first piece of code in object A, mainContext can be still used in any other object B, where as if you use second piece of code, there can be only one thread accessing mainContext at that time. – Srikanth Jan 24 '13 at 11:39

As stated in first comment those are two different type of lock. One is blocking other thread access to the whole instance of your class, until you have finished. This means you cannot call other methods of such class, or, better, your message sent to the instance are blocked.

The other lock is just blocking access to your NSManagedObjectContext.

However Apple says it is not necessary to synchronize the context. Instead, if you have multiple NSManagedObjectContext sharing a single NSPersistenceStoreCoordinator, it is better to lock the coordinator instead.

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