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All, I have been given the job to multi-thread a large C# application. To do this I have chosen to go use async/await. I am well aware of the use of IProgress<T> to report progress to the UI (let’s call this 'pushing' information to the UI), but I also need to 'pull' data from the UI (in my case a SpreadsheetGear workbook, which contains data). It is this two-way interaction that I want some advice on...

Currently I fire a click event to start the processing, and the code has the following structure:

CancellationTokenSource cancelSource;
private async void SomeButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // Set up progress reporting.
    IProgress<CostEngine.ProgressInfo> progressIndicator =
        new Progress<CostEngine.ProgressInfo>();

    // Set up cancellation support, and UI scheduler.
    cancelSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
    CancellationToken token = cancelSource.Token;
    TaskScheduler UIScheduler = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();

    // Run the script processor async.
    CostEngine.ScriptProcessor script = new CostEngine.ScriptProcessor(this);
    await script.ProcessScriptAsync(doc, progressIndicator, token, UIScheduler);

    // Do stuff in continuation...
    ...
}

Then in ProcessScriptAsync, I have the following:

public async Task ProcessScriptAsync(
    SpreadsheetGear.Windows.Forms.WorkbookView workbookView, 
    IProgress<ProgressInfo> progressInfo,
    CancellationToken token, 
    TaskScheduler UIScheduler)
{
    // This is still on the UI thread.
    // Here do some checks on the script workbook on the UI thread.
    try
    {
        workbookView.GetLock();
        // Now perform tests...
    }
    finally { workbookView.ReleaseLock(); }

    // Set the main processor off on a background thread-pool thread using await.
    Task<bool> generateStageTask = null;
    generateStageTask = Task.Factory.StartNew<bool>(() => 
        GenerateStage(workbookView, 
            progressInfo, 
            token, 
            UIScheduler));
    bool bGenerationSuccess = await generateStageTask;

    // Automatic continuation back on UI thread.
    if (!bGenerationSuccess) { // Do stuff... }
    else {
     // Do other stuff
    }
}

This, so far, seems fine. The problem I now have is in the method GenerateStage, which is now run on a background thread-pool thread

private bool GenerateStage(
    SpreadsheetGear.WorkbookView workbookView, 
    IProgress<ProgressInfo> progressInfo, 
    CancellationToken token, 
    TaskScheduler scheduler)
{
    ...
    // Get the required data using the relevant synchronisation context.
    SpreadsheetGear.IWorksheet worksheet = null;
    SpreadsheetGear.IRange range = null;
    Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        worksheet = workbookView.ActiveWorksheet;
        range = worksheet.UsedRange;
    }, CancellationToken.None,
       TaskCreationOptions.None,
       scheduler);
    try
    {
        task.Wait();
    }
    finally
    {
        task.Dispose();
    }

    // Now perform operations with 'worksheet'/'range' on the thread-pool thread...
}

In this method I need to pull data from the UI and write data to the UI many times. For the writing I can clearly use 'progressInfo', but how to handle the pulling information from the UI. Here, I have used the UI thread synchronisation context, but this will be done many times. Is there a better way to perform these operations/are there any flaws in my current approach?

Note. Clearly I would wrap the Task.Factory.StartNew(...) code up into a reusable method, the above is shown explicitly for breivity.

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1  
So, WorkbookView has to be accessed from the UI thread, but IWorksheet and IRange can be used from another thread? Couldn't you just pass the two objects to GenerateStage()? –  svick Jan 24 '13 at 11:44
1  
workbookViewAsync = workbookView will not create a copy, it will just copy the reference to another variable. But the new variable will still point to the old object. –  svick Jan 24 '13 at 11:59
    
The first post is a reasonable suggestion, but to perform operations on a worksheet or IRange you have to call GetLock() on the workbook set or WorkbookView, this again means accessing the WorkbookView which is created on the UI thread. –  Killercam Jan 24 '13 at 12:31
    
Your second point is a good one also! This was an ill thought out suggestion which I will remove... –  Killercam Jan 24 '13 at 12:32
    
@svick I have developed a testing application - small but undertakes the operations I am currently concerned about. An additional thing that I am confused about is that in the test app I can access the workbookView in GenerateStage WITHOUT changing the synchronisation context - I don't know why this is happening, if I update other controls I get the usual InvalidOperationException?? Very odd... –  Killercam Jan 24 '13 at 12:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're constantly going back and forth between UI and thread pool threads, your code is going to be a bit messy.

You essentially have two options: have your "normal" context be the thread pool thread with portions scheduled to the UI thread (as you have it now), or have your "normal" context be the UI thread with portions scheduled to a thread pool thread.

I usually prefer the latter, since you can use the simpler Task.Run instead of Task.Factory.StartNew on a specific TaskScheduler. But either way, the code is going to be a bit messy.

share|improve this answer
    
I am also not entirely convinced that what I am doing is the best approach, but I really can't see another. The code is old and complex - re-designing in order to support multi-threading, not only seems unnessesary (as the code is well written to do its job), but in this case I don't see how it would help me. I am concerned mainly over the number of Tasks I am spinning off to pull data from the UI. Clearly spawning these threads will have an enevitable overhead - what kind of overhead I don't know yet... Thanks for your time. –  Killercam Jan 24 '13 at 17:41

I didn't work with SpreadsheetGear workbook, but I suppose that it has an event mechanism which you could use for storing relevant data for you in a custom object which you can access from the outside of the UISynchronizationContext, in this way you avoid to be strongly bounded to the workbook UI control. This will permit you to avoid blocking UI thread with

 Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    worksheet = workbookView.ActiveWorksheet;
    range = worksheet.UsedRange;
}, CancellationToken.None,
   TaskCreationOptions.None,
   scheduler);
try
{
    task.Wait();
}
finally
{
    task.Dispose();
}

part from the GenerateStage method.

But again, my suggestion is based on some assumptions about SpreadsheetGear workbook controls, that can be incorrect.

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1  
You can look at the documentation to confirm or refute your assumptions. –  svick Jan 24 '13 at 11:43

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