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A lot of literature talks about using inline functions to "avoid the overhead of a function call". However I haven't seen quantifiable data. What is the actual overhead of a function call i.e. what sort of performance increase do we achieve by inlining functions?

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Is there any reason why you seem to ask questions but accept no answers? It's usually good practice on these sites to reward good answers with feedback in recognition for the time people invest in answering your question. You've got a few very good answers below... (nudge) –  Assad Ebrahim Oct 7 '12 at 5:44

12 Answers 12

On most architectures, the cost consists of saving all (or some, or none) of the registers to the stack, pushing the function arguments to the stack (or putting them in registers), incrementing the stack pointer and jumping to the beginning of the new code. Then when the function is done, you have to restore the registers from the stack. This webpage has a description of what's involved in the various calling conventions.

Most C++ compilers are smart enough now to inline functions for you. The inline keyword is just a hint to the compiler. Some will even do inlining across translation units where they decide it's helpful.

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on x86 (and many other arches) not ALL the registers need to be backed up because they are expected to be changed by function calls. C calling convention on x86 typically doesn't preserve eax, ecx and edx. –  Evan Teran Sep 28 '08 at 4:30
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Pushing all function parameters to the stack is the C ABI. C++ does not specify a specific ABI as part of the standard (unlike C). Thus allowing each compiler to optimize as required. Hence most C++ compilers don't push all parameters to the stack. –  Loki Astari Sep 28 '08 at 5:39
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@Martin York: C's ABI is not part of the standard -- it can't be, the standard is architecture agnostic, while the ABI depends on architecture. The standardized ABIs for C, which let it be used as a base interchange and glue language, are done by the OS or chip manufacturer. BeOS has a C++ ABI. –  wnoise Sep 28 '08 at 6:21
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Yup, and for Itanium Intel provided the C++ ABI. –  MSalters Sep 29 '08 at 12:25

There's the technical and the practical answer. The practical answer is it will never matter, and in the very rare case it does the only way you'll know is through actual profiled tests.

The technical answer, which your literature refers to, is generally not relevant due to compiler optimizations. But if you're still interested, is well described by Josh.

As far as a "percentage" you'd have to know how expensive the function itself was. Outside of the cost of the called function there is no percentage because you are comparing to a zero cost operation. For inlined code there is no cost, the processor just moves to the next instruction. The downside to inling is a larger code size which manifests it's costs in a different way than the stack construction/tear down costs.

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The amount of overhead will depend on the compiler, CPU, etc. The percentage overhead will depend on the code you're inlining. The only way to know is to take your code and profile it both ways - that's why there's no definitive answer.

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For very small functions inlining makes sense, because the (small) cost of the function call is significant relative to the (very small) cost of the function body. For most functions over a few lines it's not a big win.

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It's worth pointing out that an inlined function increases the size of the calling function and anything that increases the size of a function may have a negative affect on caching. If you're right at a boundary, "just one more wafer thin mint" of inlined code might have a dramatically negative effect on performance.


If you're reading literature that's warning about "the cost of a function call," I'd suggest it may be older material that doesn't reflect modern processors. Unless you're in the embedded world, the era in which C is a "portable assembly language" has essentially passed. A large amount of the ingenuity of the chip designers in the past decade (say) has gone into all sorts of low-level complexities that can differ radically from the way things worked "back in the day."

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Your question is one of the questions, that has no answer one could call the "absolute truth". The overhead of a normal function call depends on three factors:

  1. The CPU. The overhead of x86, PPC, and ARM CPUs varies a lot and even if you just stay with one architecture, the overhead also varies quite a bit between an Intel Pentium 4, Intel Core 2 Duo and an Intel Core i7. The overhead might even vary noticeably between an Intel and an AMD CPU, even if both run at the same clock speed, since factors like cache sizes, caching algorithms, memory access patterns and the actual hardware implementation of the call opcode itself can have a huge influence on the overhead.

  2. The ABI (Application Binary Interface). Even with the same CPU, there often exist different ABIs that specify how function calls pass parameters (via registers, via stack, or via a combination of both) and where and how stack frame initialization and clean-up takes place. All this has an influence on the overhead. Different operating systems may use different ABIs for the same CPU; e.g. Linux, Windows and Solaris may all three use a different ABI for the same CPU.

  3. The Compiler. Strictly following the ABI is only important if functions are called between independent code units, e.g. if an application calls a function of a system library or a user library calls a function of another user library. As long as functions are "private", not visible outside a certain library or binary, the compiler may "cheat". It may not strictly follow the ABI but instead use shortcuts that lead to faster function calls. E.g. it may pass parameters in register instead of using the stack or it may skip stack frame setup and clean-up completely if not really necessary.

If you want to know the overhead for a specific combination of the three factors above, e.g. for Intel Core i5 on Linux using GCC, your only way to get this information is benchmarking the difference between two implementations, one using function calls and one where you copy the code directly into the caller; this way you force inlining for sure, since the inline statement is only a hint and does not always lead to inlining.

However, the real question here is: Does the exact overhead really matter? One thing is for sure: A function call always has an overhead. It may be small, it may be big, but it is for sure existent. And no matter how small it is if a function is called often enough in a performance critical section, the overhead will matter to some degree. Inlining rarely makes your code slower, unless you terribly overdo it; it will make the code bigger though. Today's compilers are pretty good at deciding themselves when to inline and when not, so you hardly ever have to rack your brain about it.

Personally I ignore inlining during development completely, until I have a more or less usable product that I can profile and only if profiling tells me, that a certain function is called really often and also within a performance critical section of the application, then I will consider "force-inlining" of this function.

So far my answer is very generic, it applies to C as much as it applies to C++ and Objective-C. As a closing word let me say something about C++ in particular: Methods that are virtual are double indirect function calls, that means they have a higher function call overhead than normal function calls and also they cannot be inlined. Non-virtual methods might be inlined by the compiler or not but even if they are not inlined, they are still significant faster than virtual ones, so you should not make methods virtual, unless you really plan to override them or have them overridden.

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There is a great concept called 'register shadowing', which allows to pass ( up to 6 ? ),values thru registers ( on CPU ) instead of stack ( memory ). Also, depending on the function and variables used within, compiler may just decide that frame management code is not required !!

Also, even C++ compiler may do a 'tail recursion optimiztaion', i.e. if A() calls B(), and after calling B(), A just returns, compiler will reuse the stack frame !!

Of course, this all can be done, only if program sticks to the semantics of standard ( see pointer aliasing and it's effect on optimizations )

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The optimization you describe is not "tail recursion optimization", what you describe is real optimization...but tail recursion optimization is when a recursive function can be changed into function which loops because the recursion occurs at the end or "tail" of the function. –  Evan Teran Sep 28 '08 at 4:34
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Both are actually 'tail call optimisation': tail recursion is simply the special case of tail calling that calls itself. –  Simon Buchan Sep 28 '08 at 10:29

Modern CPUs are very fast (obviously!). Almost every operation involved with calls and argument passing are full speed instructions (indirect calls might be slightly more expensive, mostly the first time through a loop).

Function call overhead is so small, only loops that call functions can make call overhead relevant.

Therefore, when we talk about (and measure) function call overhead today, we are usually really talking about the overhead of not being able to hoist common subexpressions out of loops. If a function has to do a bunch of (identical) work every time it is called, the compiler would be able to "hoist" it out of the loop and do it once if it was inlined. When not inlined, the code will probably just go ahead and repeat the work, you told it to!

Inlined functions seem impossibly faster not because of call and argument overhead, but because of common subexpressions that can be hoisted out of the function.

Example:

Foo::result_type MakeMeFaster()
{
  Foo t = 0;
  for (auto i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
    t += CheckOverhead(SomethingUnpredictible());
  return t.result();
}

Foo CheckOverhead(int i)
{
  auto n = CalculatePi_1000_digits();
  return i * n;
}

An optimizer can see through this foolishness and do:

Foo::result_type MakeMeFaster()
{
  Foo t;
  auto _hidden_optimizer_tmp = CalculatePi_1000_digits();
  for (auto i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
    t += SomethingUnpredictible() * _hidden_optimizer_tmp;
  return t.result();
}

It seems like call overhead is impossibly reduced because it really has hoised a big chunk of the function out of the loop (the CalculatePi_1000_digits call). The compiler would need to be able to prove that CalculatePi_1000_digits always returns the same result, but good optimizers can do that.

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Each new function requires a new local stack to be created. But the overhead of this would only be noticeable if you are calling a function on every iteration of a loop over a very large number of iterations.

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You mean "new stack frame", rather than "new stack", yes? –  Andrew Edgecombe Sep 28 '08 at 8:57

For most functions, their is no additional overhead for calling them in C++ vs C (unless you count that the "this" pointer as an unnecessary argument to every function.. You have to pass state to a function somehow tho)...

For virtual functions, their is an additional level of indirection (equivalent to a calling a function through a pointer in C)... But really, on today's hardware this is trivial.

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The compiler will hardly ever inline a virtual function, so you're making a moot point. The only exception is when the object type is known at compile time, then the indirection can be skipped. –  Mark Ransom Sep 28 '08 at 2:28

I don't have any numbers, either, but I'm glad you're asking. Too often I see people try to optimize their code starting with vague ideas of overhead, but not really knowing.

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There are a few issues here.

  • If you have a smart enough compiler, it will do some automatic inlining for you even if you did not specify inline. On the other hand, there are many things that cannot be inlined.

  • If the function is virtual, then of course you are going to pay the price that it cannot be inlined because the target is determined at runtime. Conversely, in Java, you might be paying this price unless you indicate that the method is final.

  • Depending on how your code is organized in memory, you may be paying a cost in cache misses and even page misses as the code is located elsewhere. That can end up having a huge impact in some applications.

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Sorry, the virtual bit is the wrong way around. If your object is on the stack, within that function the compiler will know the type at compile time. Hence, it can resolve calls immediately, and doesn't need to put in a vtable lookup –  MSalters Sep 29 '08 at 12:27
    
I'm not sure I see the point of this comment. Obviously in situations where there is no dynamic dispatching this is not going to be an issue. However, in many cases you will be using pointers and potentially polymorphic code, and it is not uncommon to see code upcasts or downcasts stack objects. –  Uri Oct 13 '08 at 4:48

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