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I have a query in which I am calculating time. I want to make time double so that if the time is 01:40 then it should become 03:20. Here is my current query

SELECT TO_CHAR(TRUNC((ATN_INN-ACT_INN)*24),'09')||':'||  
TO_CHAR(TRUNC(((ATN_INN-ACT_INN)*24-TRUNC((ATN_INN-ACT_INN)*24))*60),'09') B
FROM SML.EMP_INFO A

How should I go about this?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by APC, Josh Caswell, John Doyle, Frédéric Hamidi, Johann Blais Mar 3 '14 at 14:26

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What is double 11:59 PM? –  Ben Jan 24 '13 at 10:46
    
i am calculating total time as 01:40 now i make it double as 03:20 –  user1915635 Jan 24 '13 at 10:48
1  
Yes, as I said I understand, what time is double 11:59 PM (23:59)? or 12:01 PM (anything after midday)? –  Ben Jan 24 '13 at 10:54
1  
No, it's not. 46 hours is 46 hours there is no possible way to have 40 minutes out of this. Please stop re-stating your question. No one is going to be able to help you effectively until you answer either my of @GTG's questions... Is 46 hours measured in days and hours or just in hours, if it's measured in just hours is it 46 hours or 22 hours? –  Ben Jan 24 '13 at 11:16
1  
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: there is a data type representing time stamps: it's called interval –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 24 '13 at 11:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you really what to work only with the time element, the easiest way to so is to employ the 'SSSSS' date mask, which returns the number of seconds after midnight. So this query will return double the number of seconds between the two columns:

select ( to_number(to_char(atn_inn, 'sssss')) 
          - to_number(to_char(acn_inn, 'sssss')) ) * 2 as double_diff_in secs
from sml.emp_info
/ 

Converting seconds into hours and minutes is left as an exercise for the reader.

Note that this query only makes sense if ATN_INN is later than ACT_INN but still on the same day. This is the clarification @Ben was trying to make (with no success). If this is not the case a different solution is required, something like ....

select ( ( extract ( hour from diff ) * 60) 
            + extract ( minute from diff  ) ) *2  as double_diff_in mins
from ( select to_dsinterval ( atn_inn - act_inn ) as diff
        from sml.emp_info )
/

This returns the doubled different in minutes. Again, rendering the output into a display format is left to the reader.

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I always love your little asides! I have no idea if you're right but it's a good compromise (and extensible) solution. –  Ben Jan 24 '13 at 21:31

Supposing you have column time_value

select  convert(varchar(11),time_value+time_value,108) as DoubleTime
from <your-table>

This works for sql server 2005

time_value      DoubleTime
16:39:05.000    09:18:10
01:40:00.000    03:20:00
11:59:00.000    23:58:00
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what is this Sir ? –  user1915635 Jan 24 '13 at 11:02
2  
This is SQL server... –  Ben Jan 24 '13 at 11:04
    
Adding time value to itself 1:40 + 1:40 –  mmhasannn Jan 24 '13 at 11:08

It seems to me you are using the method described here (Subtraction between dates): http://www.akadia.com/services/ora_date_time.html

If you want to double the lenght of the period, you really only need to multiply the base time difference with 2, like this:

SELECT TO_CHAR(TRUNC((2*(ATN_INN-ACT_INN))*24),'09')
    || ':' ||  
    TO_CHAR(TRUNC(((2*(ATN_INN-ACT_INN))*24
        -TRUNC((2*(ATN_INN-ACT_INN))*24))*60),'09') B
FROM SML.EMP_INFO A

This will give you the hour part and the minutes part of your results, you will probably want to have the days part too.

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