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I'm writing a library in C++ and have a class hierarchy like this:

message.h file (in ./mylib/src)

class Message
{
};

request.h file (in ./mylib/include/mylib)

#include "message.h"

class Request : public Message
{
};

response.h file (in ./mylib/include/mylib)

#include "message.h"

class Response : public Message
{
};

I want everything in my mylib/src folder to be hidden from user and want only to distrubute files in mylib/include. But the problem is as both requst.h and response.h #include message.h so user will get a "No such file" error when #including request.h and response.h. Is there a way to work around this problem?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can simply provide a public interface for Message and keep the actual class hidden:

class IMessage
{
    Message* pImpl;
};

Distribute this header and use a forward declaration for Message.

Another option would be to use composition instead of inheritance (you'll need pointers as members, not the full object).

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1  
More info on pimpl: herbsutter.com/gotw/_100 and herbsutter.com/gotw/_101 – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 24 '13 at 13:15
    
Thanks. I'd go for the second option. – jpen Jan 24 '13 at 14:25

If you want to be able to use Response and Request you need to include the header files where they are declared. That is why you should put those headers in the public include folder.

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Thanks for your response. Ideally I'd like to distribute only one header file (say "mylib.h") and allow user to use both Request and Response by #including this header file. Is this possible? If so, what would mylib.h contain? – jpen Jan 24 '13 at 14:26

The base class should be publically distributed, or else you will have to write serialization / deserialization mecanisms.

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