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How to Speedup a Java application?

I am working on an Java application, which parse Cobol files line by line, extract the necessary data from them and populate into DB2 database.

If there are more files to parse, then the application takes more than 24 hrs to complete, which is not acceptable.

So I do some table population in a separate thread for speedup ..e.g.

ArrayList list = (ArrayList)vList.clone();
ThreadPopulator populator = new ThreadPopulator(connection, list, srcMbr);
Thread thread = new Thread(populator);
thread.run();
return;


And ThreadPopulator class is implementing Runnable interface and run method as

public void run()
{
    try
    {
        synchronized (this)
        {
           int len = Utils.length(list);
           for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
           {
              .....
              stmt.addBatch();
            if ((i + 1) % 5000 == 0)
                    stmt.executeBatch(); // Execute every 5000 items.
           }
        }
    }
    catch (Throwable e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace():
    }
    finally
    {
        if (list != null)
            list.clear();
    }
}

Note: Need to use clone, so that next thread can't vanish the entries.

Am I thinking in right way?

Please suggest me, what the way I have to choose to speedup my application over a thousands of Cobol file.

share|improve this question
1  
A better way to scale IMO would be to parallelize files processing work. –  Andrew Logvinov Jan 24 '13 at 13:55
    
The whole application code can't be rewrite in parallelize files processing. But Database population can be done. –  Kishore Jan 24 '13 at 13:59
2  
You must provide more numbers. When does it take more than 24hrs? Are you sure you don't have an IO bottleneck (network, disk, database)? Why do you synchronize the run method on this? How about your heap (verbose gcs available)? just to name a few... –  home Jan 24 '13 at 14:00
    
Parsing takes more time, even on large no of lines, and population of Database takes less time than parsing. –  Kishore Jan 24 '13 at 14:08
    
If parsing takes the most time, can we see the parsing code ??? –  Bruce Martin Jan 24 '13 at 22:56

2 Answers 2

You need to first determine what is it spending most of it's time doing. This requires measuring the CPU and possibly memory usage. Is it the parsing which is using CPU, or the database which is using IO.

Without measuring what is your performance bottleneck, you can't make an informed decision as to what need to be improved.

From my experience, I would suspect the database first. You have batch sizes of 5000 which should be enough. How much CPU is it using when the program is running e.g. is one CPU always busy?

Note: You can write a simple text parser to read about 40-100 MB/s. To run for 24 hours you would need to have many TB of data to load which sounds unlikely to be the cause.

Actually first need to rewrite the file in proper format then read those lines & extract necessary data, even source lines read by 2-3 times for a single file, (actually this is logic part). When I run the application on 4000K files, it runs for 24 hrs.

4 million files is going to be a performance problem. Even a trivial file open takes about 8 ms for a fast HDD and if you open it 2-3 times each it will take about 30 hours in total. (I assume your disk cache saves you a few hours) The only way to make it faster is to;

  • use less files. 4 million is an insane number to open multiple times. Opening them just once each will take about 10 hours (never mind doing something with them)
  • use a faster drive e.g. an SSD can do this in about 1/100th of the time. an HDD can perform up to 120 IOPS, an cheap SSD can do 40,000 IOPS and a good one 230,000 IOPS. The later could open 4 million files in ~12 seconds which is faster than 10 hours. ;)
  • pass all the files only once. It will still be slow, but it will be 2-3x faster.

Note: using more threads won't make your hard drives go faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually first need to rewrite the file in proper format then read those lines & extract necessary data, even source lines read by 2-3 times for a single file, (actually this is logic part). When I run the application on 4000K files, it runs for 24 hrs. –  Kishore Jan 24 '13 at 14:11
    
I have updated my answer. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 24 '13 at 14:19

You're calling

thread.run();

instead of

thread.start();

which means you're not actually running your code in a separate thread...

Other than that I'd like to second @Peter's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I tested in both way, but no faster population is found. –  Kishore Jan 24 '13 at 14:12
    
Then you don't need the overhead of creating a thread... –  beny23 Jan 24 '13 at 15:05

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