Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having a strange problem with converting a string to a byte array to hash it. Right now, my code is something like this:

    String textToHash = "test"; 
    MessageDigest messageDigest = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
    messageDigest.update(textToHash.getBytes("UTF-8"));
    hash = messageDigest.digest();

Even though the string is the same, on different runs, the byte array (generated from textToHash.getBytes("UTF-8")) changes. Sometimes it will have one value, and other times it will change even though the string is static. Why is this happening and how can I make it reliably hash a string?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
I'd think this has to be a case of "what you think is happening is not what is actually happening". String.getBytes should return the same thing for a given input string. What exactly leads you to believe that the input String is the same but that getBytes returns a different result? –  davmac Jan 24 '13 at 15:18
    
My input string is always "test". When I print the value of textToHash.getBytes, it will sometimes return a different value. –  Andrew Hassan Jan 24 '13 at 16:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

call MessageDigest.reset before update

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/security/MessageDigest.html#reset()

share|improve this answer
    
That still doesn't work. It breaks before hashing. Essentially it's the getBytes call that's not working. The byte array that that produces is what varies. Not the output of the hash function. –  Andrew Hassan Jan 24 '13 at 15:05
    
@AndrewHassan sorry. Are you sure byte[] form for String.getBytes are different each time ? plz paste the testcase –  farmer1992 Jan 24 '13 at 15:20
    
I wasn't using any test cases, just debugging. If I print or view the value of the bytes, it will output different values from time to time. Here is one of my outputs: Test #0 String: test Bytes: [B@68111f9b Test #1 String: test Bytes: [B@21c8dfe6 Test #2 String: test Bytes: [B@ae3865e Test #3 String: test Bytes: [B@5f8a8ae7 Test #4 String: test Bytes: [B@a574b2 Test #5 String: test Bytes: [B@6e905272 Test #6 String: test Bytes: [B@4514f313 Test #7 String: test Bytes: [B@626287d3 Test #8 String: test Bytes: [B@32c3601b Test #9 String: test Bytes: [B@38daa6a6 –  Andrew Hassan Jan 24 '13 at 16:24
    
@AndrewHassan [B@xx means byte[] at mem addr xx . you should do like this byte[] b = new byte[]{1,2,3}; System.out.println(b); // wrong System.out.println(Arrays.toString(b)); –  farmer1992 Jan 24 '13 at 16:27
1  
Oh, I can't believe I missed that. I feel really dumb right now haha. Thanks for your help! –  Andrew Hassan Jan 24 '13 at 16:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.