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I'm trying to make my WSGI server implementation compatible with both Python 2 and Python 3. I had this code:

def start_response(status, response_headers, exc_info = None):
    if exc_info:
        try:
            if headers_sent:
                # Re-raise original exception if headers sent.
                raise exc_info[0], exc_info[1], exc_info[2]
        finally:
            # Avoid dangling circular ref.
            exc_info = None
    elif headers_set:
        raise AssertionError("Headers already set!")

    headers_set[:] = [status, response_headers]
    return write

...with the relevant part being:

# Re-raise original exception if headers sent.
raise exc_info[0], exc_info[1], exc_info[2]

Python 3 doesn't support that syntax anymore so it must be translated to:

raise exc_info[0].with_traceback(exc_info[1], exc_info[2])

Problem: the Python 2 syntax generates a parse error in Python 3. How do I write code that can be parsed by both Python 2 and Python 3? I've tried the following, but that doesn't work:

if sys.version_info[0] >= 3:
    raise exc_info[0].with_traceback(exc_info[1], exc_info[2])
else:
    eval("raise exc_info[0], exc_info[1], exc_info[2]; 1", None, { 'exc_info': exc_info })
share|improve this question
    
That does not make much sense to me.. Can you put your start_response function in some context, maybe show an example where you would call it? –  poke Jan 24 '13 at 14:38
    
whats wrong with the classic try/except? –  Inbar Rose Jan 24 '13 at 14:39
    
@poke and @inbar rose: start_response is part of the WSGI spec. See PEP-333. WSGI apps call start_response when they, well, want to start a response. If exc_info is given then that is the WSGI app's signal that the app code encountered an exception, and the WSGI server should do something with it such as printing an error. In my case I want to raise the error if headers have already been sent out. See python.org/dev/peps/pep-0333/#the-start-response-callable –  Hongli Jan 24 '13 at 14:49
    
Quick clarification, you state that the Python 3 syntax generates a parse error in python 2 -- It seems to me that it should be the other way around. The python 2 syntax generates a parse error in python 3 ... –  mgilson Jan 24 '13 at 14:54
1  
Have seen this? docs.python.org/3/howto/pyporting.html#use-same-source –  guettli Jan 24 '13 at 15:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do something creative.

Have a check at the start of your code - your constructor or whatever, check what version of python you are using, since your normal version checker is not working, try this instead:

try:
  eval('a python 3 expression') # something that only works in python3+
  python_version = 3
except:
  python_version = 2

Then the rest of your code can easily just reference this to know what to use.

As for the parse errors, you can use exec in a function, like so:

def what_to_run():
    if python_version = 3:
        return 'raise exc_info[0].with_traceback(exc_info[1], exc_info[2])'
    else:
        return 'raise exc_info[0], exc_info[1], exc_info[2]'

In your function you would write this:

def start_response(status, response_headers, exc_info = None):
    if exc_info:
        try:
            if headers_sent:
                # Re-raise original exception if headers sent.
                exec(what_to_run())
        finally:
            # Avoid dangling circular ref.
            exc_info = None
    elif headers_set:
        raise AssertionError("Headers already set!")

    headers_set[:] = [status, response_headers]
    return write

A bit messy, untested, but it should work, at least you understand the idea.

share|improve this answer
4  
Checking for Python is not the problem. The problem is that Python 3-compatible code generates a parse error on Python 2 and vice versa. I can't just put both versions in an if-else or try-except block like I usually do. –  Hongli Jan 24 '13 at 14:46
1  
@Hongli -- I'm pretty sure eval doesn't work since raise is a statement, not an expression. If you changed it to exec it might work though... –  mgilson Jan 24 '13 at 14:55
1  
@InbarRose -- But there's still the problem with using eval on a statement when eval requires an expression –  mgilson Jan 24 '13 at 14:58
1  
Yes, exec() instead of eval() worked, thank you. –  Hongli Jan 24 '13 at 14:59
3  
Don't do this. Use six instead, as the other answer suggests. –  fletom Mar 4 '13 at 6:11

Can you use six? It exists to solve this very problem.

import six
six.reraise(*exc_info)

See: https://pythonhosted.org/six/index.html#six.reraise

share|improve this answer
1  
didn't see it in six docs! great answer! –  codeScriber Apr 14 '13 at 13:58
    
import six import sys six.reraise(*sys.exc_info()) –  Paulo Cheque Aug 8 '13 at 23:48

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