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I have following code :

    /* Window size in bytes. */
static  uint32_t size = 0;
    /* Window address. */
static  uint32_t address = 0;
    /* Memory Base Address */   
static uint8_t *sharedMemory=NULL;

sharedMemory = memalign(size, size);

void rioShardMemoryWindowGet (uint8_t *baseAddr,uint32_t *memorySize,uint32_t *windowAddress  )
{
    *baseAddr=(int)sharedMemory;
    printf("sharedMemory: #%x",sharedMemory);
    *memorySize=size;
    *windowAddress=address;
}
rioShardMemoryWindowGet(&baseAddr0, &baseSize, &(Addrs.virtualBaseAddr));
printf("baseAddr0 : #%x",baseAddr0);

I have no clue why baseAddr0 is 0 in the second printf, while in the first sharedMemory is 0x500000.

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why is the casting *baseAddr=(int)sharedMemory; necessary? aren't they both uint8_t? –  h4lc0n Jan 24 '13 at 14:50
    
also, can you show baseAddr0 definition please? –  h4lc0n Jan 24 '13 at 14:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok I think I understand your problem.

You're trying to store the address number in baseAddr0, am I right? (not sure the reasons but this is the only thing I came up with).

The reason that a 0x500000 is showing as a 0 is because a uint8_t has not enough bits to represent an address and so it's "culling it down" to only 1 byte (therefore showing a 0).

Change the baseAddr to a uint32_t and voila, everything works.

Anyways, the reason the other posters are telling you to use a pointer to pointer is because what you seem to be doing is weird, unless you're planning on using the address for something special such as displaying it or using as an offset, perhaps?

p.s.: you're also going to need to change this line

*baseAddr=(uint32_t)sharedMemory;

edit: your code should look like this to get what you want:

    /* Window size in bytes. */
static  uint32_t size = 0;
    /* Window address. */
static  uint32_t address = 0;
    /* Memory Base Address */   
static uint8_t *sharedMemory=NULL;

sharedMemory = memalign(size, size);

void rioShardMemoryWindowGet (uint32_t *baseAddr,uint32_t *memorySize,uint32_t     *windowAddress  )
{
    *baseAddr=(uint32_t)sharedMemory;
    printf("sharedMemory: #%x",sharedMemory);
    *memorySize=size;
    *windowAddress=address;
}
rioShardMemoryWindowGet(&baseAddr0, &baseSize, &(Addrs.virtualBaseAddr));
printf("baseAddr0 : #%x",baseAddr0);

The reason why you NEED an uint32 to store the numeric address is because addresses are 32 bits, and that's the reason why you see a 0 using an 8 bit value, because 0x500000 maps to 0x00 to a byte

share|improve this answer
    
Yes your right. That's what I want. But sharedMemory is also uint8_t so it should work. But I tried your clue anyway --> no success –  user1829804 Jan 24 '13 at 15:36
    
no, no, an address needs 32 bits, it won't work with you using uint8_t because you're losing information... I'll update the above code to show you how to do it –  h4lc0n Jan 24 '13 at 15:38
    
maybe you can check the sizes of pointers with sizeof operator. –  Raj Jan 24 '13 at 15:47
    
that's also an option, just don't use an int8, you're asking to lose information that way –  h4lc0n Jan 24 '13 at 15:48
    
actually, this code will give different result on different architectures. If you want to build a portable code, this might not be a correct way to do it ! For example 32-bit and 64-bit architectures? For I think it is common to have uint32_t * a 32-bit variable, but on 64-bit architecture it can be of 64-bits ! or 8-bit architecture, it can be of 8-bits. –  Raj Jan 24 '13 at 15:50

You must pass a pointer to pointer as a function argument. Only then you will be able to store the value in it. In your case, you tried to store the address of sharedMemory in baseAddr[0] location.

/* Window size in bytes. */
static  uint32_t size = 0;
    /* Window address. */
static  uint32_t address = 0;
    /* Memory Base Address */   
static uint8_t *sharedMemory=NULL;

sharedMemory = memalign(size, size);

void rioShardMemoryWindowGet (uint8_t **baseAddr,uint32_t *memorySize,uint32_t *windowAddress  )
{
    *baseAddr=sharedMemory;
    printf("sharedMemory: #%x",sharedMemory);
    *memorySize=size;
    *windowAddress=address;
}
uint8_t *baseAddr0;
rioShardMemoryWindowGet(&baseAddr0, &baseSize, &(Addrs.virtualBaseAddr));
printf("baseAddr0 : #%x",baseAddr0);
share|improve this answer
    
And how can I store the address sharedMemory is pointing at in baseAddr? –  user1829804 Jan 24 '13 at 14:49
    
if you read the code, you will be doing it inside the function rioShardMemoryWindowGet. you pass the address oo the pointer baseAddr0 to the function in the function call. the first statement does the job you are asking for. I suggest you do a step by step debugging where you inspect the memory locations and variables to understand the concept. –  Raj Jan 24 '13 at 14:56

rioShardMemoryWindowGet should accept uint8_t **baseAddrPtr if you want it to modify baseAddr0. Then you'll have *baseAddr = sharedMemory without a cast.

share|improve this answer
    
But I just want, that baseAddr0 has the address sharedMemory is pointing to –  user1829804 Jan 24 '13 at 14:45
    
What I propose is equivalent to assigning baseAddr0 = sharedMemory; outside the function. I believe it's what you wanted, isn't it? –  Anton Kovalenko Jan 24 '13 at 14:47

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