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Suppose I have the following scenario:

    o (master)   
   /       o--o (WIP1)
  /       /
 o--o--o--o--o--o (WIP2)
(X)       \
           o--o (WIP3)

Is there a git command which creates a new branch so that it contains the subtree after branch X? I want to perform a "large rebase", I want the three WIP branches rebased on master.

I know I can do that with some Bash scripting but I'd like to know how to do that using a git command.

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possible duplicate of Rebasing a branch including all its children –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jan 3 at 18:04

3 Answers 3

There is no single git command for that. You will have to do some manual work. In your situation:

    o (master)   
   /        o--o (WIP1)
  /        /
 X--o--o--B--o--o (WIP2)
           \
            o--o (WIP3)

You first rebase WIP1 onto master:

git rebase --onto master X WIP1

which will lead to this:

               o--o (WIP1)
 (master)     /
    o--o--o--B’
   /   
  /        
 X--o--o--B--o--o (WIP2)
           \
            o--o (WIP3)

If you now run git rebase --onto master X WIP2, you get this structure:

                o--o (WIP1)
 (master)      /
     o--o--o--B’
    / \
   /   o--o--B’’--o--o (WIP2)
  /        
 X--o--o--B--o--o (WIP3)

This is probably not what you want, so now you should rebase WIP2 and WIP3 on B’:

git rebase --onto B’ B WIP2 
git rebase --onto B’ B WIP3 

which will lead to this:

                  o--o (WIP1)
(master)         /
    o--X--o--o--B’--o--o (WIP2)
                 \
                  o--o (WIP3)
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Seems similar to my edit. +1 –  VonC Jan 24 '13 at 16:23
    
Yes, saw your edit just prior to submitting, but by then I had already drawn all that ascii-art ^^ –  Chronial Jan 24 '13 at 16:24
    
You did the tests, you deserve the credits ;) –  VonC Jan 24 '13 at 16:25
   o (master)   
   /       o--o (WIP1)
  /       /
 o--p--p--o--o--o (WIP2)
(X)      (Y)
          \
           o--o (WIP3)

This should be a rebase --onto (you can see one example in "How to move certain commits to another branch in git?"):

 git rebase --onto master X WIP1
 git rebase --onto master X WIP2
 git rebase --onto master X WIP3

From Chronial's test, that would give:

         p'--p'--o--o (WIP2)
        /
 o-----o-----p--p--o--o--o (WIP1)
(X) (master)   (Y')   
        \
         p''--p''--o--o (WIP3)

So the first rebase is ok, but you need to get Y SHA, and:

 git rebase --onto Y' Y WIP2
 git rebase --onto Y' Y WIP3
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This will create three branches that diverge off of master, won’t it? Or will this move the structure behind X on top of master (so that the branches divert later)? –  Chronial Jan 24 '13 at 15:55
    
@Chronial yes, there is that risk, especially considering a rebase won't replay a commit if that the same content is detected on the destination branch. I'll have to test it out. –  VonC Jan 24 '13 at 16:00
    
just tested it, and they diverge :/ –  Chronial Jan 24 '13 at 16:01
    
@Chronial Meaning the first two commits after X are only present in WIP1? And WIP2,3 start directly from master? –  VonC Jan 24 '13 at 16:03
    
No, the first commits after X are cloned 3 times – once for each WIP. –  Chronial Jan 24 '13 at 16:04

If you want to have this result

    o (oldmaster)--o--o--B--o--o(WIP1)--o--o(WIP2)--o--o(WIP3)(master)  
   /        
  /        
 X

You should do this:

git rebase --onto master X WIP1         /* move WIP1 on master */
git rebase --onto WIP1 WIP2~3 WIP2      /* move WIP2 on WIP1 */
git rebase --onto WIP2 WIP3~3 WIP3      /* move WIP3 on WIP2 */
git reset --hard WIP3                   /* move master index to WIP3 */
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