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I have the typedef typedef std::vector<std::vector<std::vector<double>>> three_d_vector; to declare the 3D vector; but I want to know how, if I can, do I declare the individual values in a bulk list, like an array.

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closed as not a real question by Mark B, BЈовић, Mario Sannum, Borealid, CoolBeans Jan 24 '13 at 23:08

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are your values constants? – Mats Petersson Jan 24 '13 at 15:22
    
what do you mean "in a bulk list"? with C++11 you can use initializer lists, but not sure that's what you're asking for – Andy Prowl Jan 24 '13 at 15:23
    
Are you talking about an array of three_d_vector? – Beta Jan 24 '13 at 15:23
    
I imagine something like vector<vector<vector<int> > > a = {{{1,2}, {3,4}, .....}}} – Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 24 '13 at 15:24
    
@IvayloStrandjev: assuming he's using C++11, then yes, initializer list should do the job – Andy Prowl Jan 24 '13 at 15:24

Assuming you are working on C++11 and what you're asking for is a direct way to initialize your vector:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    typedef vector<vector<vector<double>>> three_d_vector;

    three_d_vector v =
    {
        {
            { 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 5, 6 }
        },
        {
            { 0, 0, 1 }, { 1, 0, 0 }
        },
        {
            { 4, 0, 1 }, { 1, 0, 5 }
        },
    };
}

However, please notice that defining a 3D vector this way will give you freedom to have different vector sizes for each dimension. In other words, this will be legal:

    three_d_vector v =
    {
        {
            { 1, 2, 3, 7 }, { 4, 5, 6 }
        },
        {
            { 0, 0, 1 }, { 1, 0, 0, 8, 9, 15 }
        },
        {
            { 4, 0, 1 }, { 1, 0 }
        },
    };

Whether this is desired, acceptable or unacceptable depends on your use case; anyway, I guess you might want to have a look at Boost.MultiArray.

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You need to compile in C++11 mode (e.g. use the command-line switch -std=c++11 for gcc) and use a syntax like this:

three_d_vector vec = { { {1., 2.}, {3.,  4., 17., 25.} },
                       { {5., 6., 12.}, {7.,  8.}, {0., 22.} },
                       { {9., 10.}, {11.}, {45.}, {33.}, {37., 11.} };
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Using a std::vector<std::vector<std::vector<double>>> won't be very cache coherent. Use a Boost.MultiArray instead.

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