Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can we create a connection string to the Microsoft Access using C# programming dynamically? I tries the following code-

OleDbConnection con = new OleDbConnection();
String path = Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.Desktop);
con.ConnectionString = "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0; Data Source=" + path + "\\nik.mdb";

I got this result in response:

Format of the initialization string does not conform to specification starting at index 55.

When i edit my string it looks as below:

Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0; Data Source=C:\Users\nikhil\desktop\nik.mdb

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
4  
"But got an error. " - that's, so ....informative.... – Mitch Wheat Jan 24 '13 at 15:23
    
@MitchWheat Should i print the error i got???? – user1929236 Jan 24 '13 at 15:24
4  
No, it's more fun if we have to guess.... – Mitch Wheat Jan 24 '13 at 15:24
1  
You can use OleDbConnectionStringBuilder which gives you intellisense for available properties, and can construct the connection string with .ToString(). You still have to get the Provider and Data Source settings exactly right, which can be finicky. – mellamokb Jan 24 '13 at 15:25
1  
@user1929236: That's not true. You would just do con.ConnectionString = myBuilder.ConnectionString. Also, ConnectionStrings.com is a very good resource. – mellamokb Jan 24 '13 at 15:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use Path.Combine and a OleDbConnectionStringBuilder to create a valid connection-string:

var conString = string.Format("Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0; Data Source={0}"
                             , Path.Combine(dir, "nik.mdb"));
var conBuilder = new OleDbConnectionStringBuilder(conString);
using (var con = new OleDbConnection(conBuilder.ConnectionString))
{
    // ...
}

Maybe you have white-spaces in the connection string.

Update Since you've edited your question and provided your connection-string. There is a white-space between OLEDB.4.0; and Data. That might be a possible reason for your exception. Then the ConnectionStringBuilder helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I just tested in LINQPad, and it works fine for me. Using a space between 4.0; and Data Source doesn't seem to make a difference either. – mellamokb Jan 24 '13 at 15:39
    
@mellamokb: Not sure if this causes the issue. But when i use the builder with his connection-string it removes the white-space. So this is just a wild guess, but at least it should help to increase readability and to be less error-prone (Path.Combine, using-statement). – Tim Schmelter Jan 24 '13 at 15:41
    
Agreed. It appears to me that a core piece of information is actually missing from the connection string. connectionstrings.com/access shows that a workgroup database or password may be required. I didn't need either in my test database, but some databases are setup with workgroup security. – mellamokb Jan 24 '13 at 15:42
    
The problem is not of the white spaces. It is due to the no use of the OleDbConnectionStringBuilder for the connection string – user1929236 Jan 24 '13 at 15:43
1  
@TimSchmelter Yes, i was creating the connection string as mentioned above in the post. But it was not working. I am new to the C# and knew only a bit about it. So, I tried searching but didn't find any result. So, i asked. So, the only thing that matters me is that I have lack of the knowledge about the subject. I used OledbConnectionBuilder and it really worked fr me. – user1929236 Jan 24 '13 at 15:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.