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I have an application which queries data from a 3rd party product. As such, i'm keen not to change the table structure.

Is there a way I can improve efficiency purely on the query side?

My query is:

CallsClosed.Query = @"SELECT COALESCE(ti.FIRST_NAME,'Not Assigned') AS 'Technician', COUNT(*) 'Calls_Closed'
FROM WorkOrder_Threaded wot
INNER JOIN WorkOrder wo ON wot.WORKORDERID=wo.WORKORDERID
LEFT JOIN SDUser sdu ON wo.REQUESTERID=sdu.USERID
LEFT JOIN AaaUser aau ON sdu.USERID=aau.USER_ID
LEFT JOIN WorkOrderStates wos ON wo.WORKORDERID=wos.WORKORDERID
LEFT JOIN SDUser td ON wos.OWNERID=td.USERID
LEFT JOIN AaaUser ti ON td.USERID=ti.USER_ID
WHERE (wo.COMPLETEDTIME != 0) AND (wo.COMPLETEDTIME != -1) AND (wo.COMPLETEDTIME IS NOT NULL)
AND wo.COMPLETEDTIME >= (UNIX_TIMESTAMP(TIMESTAMP('" + sdChartRange.From + @"')) * 1000)
AND wot.THD_WOID=wot.WORKORDERID
GROUP BY Technician ORDER BY 'Calls_Closed' DESC";

I've run JetProfiler on this, and it looks like the main offender is the size of the wot table. (c. 19k rows)

Any suggestions on where I should start to speed the query up? (Currently takes about 4s to run)

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3  
Do you count adding indexes as changing the table structure? –  ceejayoz Jan 24 '13 at 15:36
    
Might do if I draw a blank elsewhere - but I'm trying to avoid it in case I break anything! –  Ben Jan 24 '13 at 15:52
    
Being closed word orders, will they always have matching users? If so INNER JOINs will possibly be faster. Also consider calculating the unix timestamp manually before the SELECT rather than doing it in the SELECT (I would expect MySQL to optimise it well as it is at the moment but wouldn't guarantee it). Oh and indexes are very important as already suggested. –  Kickstart Jan 24 '13 at 15:54
    
@Ben Adding indexes is almost certainly the best thing you can do, and as long as they're normal indexes have near-zero chance of breaking stuff in your situation as far as I can tell. They'll lock the tables while they're initially generated, though. –  ceejayoz Jan 24 '13 at 16:00
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2 Answers

  • Make sure you have indexes on the fields used for selection and joins.
  • Check for foreign keys that are no longer valid ('dangling').
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  1. Minimise the number of joins you have to do.
  2. Echoing the comment, add indices.
  3. Look at the EXPLAIN QUERY result for that query.
  4. If solved to satisfaction, post sample data in a fiddle and I'll take a look.
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Thanks for this - given me somewhere to start! This might be a dumb question, but is there a performance difference between using an index field the primary key ID? All the joins above use the PK ID already, so wasn't sure how indexing would affect it. –  Ben Jan 24 '13 at 15:51
    
@Ben Given that I did not see any sample data, I couldn't tell if you were using the primary key or not. –  hd1 Jan 25 '13 at 4:45
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