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What kind of errors can -[NSManagedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:error:] and -[NSFetchedResultsController performFetch:] return to the user and how should they be handled? I cannot find anything in the documentation about the possible errors for these methods. Also none of the error codes defined in CoreData/CoreDataErrors.h seem to apply to fetching.

Right now my error handling for Core Data fetches is just a NSAssert like this:

 NSError *fetchError = nil;
 NSArray *fetchedResults = [context executeFetchRequest: request error: &fetchError];
 NSAssert( fetchedResults, @"Error fetching: %@", fetchError );

While testing I never had this assertion fail, but that doesn’t mean that this cannot fail. What are the best practices to handle those errors gracefully?

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When executing a fetch request, I populate the expected array with an empty array instead of leaving it nil.

NSError *error;
NSArray *array = [context executeFetchRequest:request error:&error];
if (array == nil)
{
    NSLog(@"Error retrieving array of values %@", error);
    array = [NSArray array];
}

If you ever want to test your error handling, this answer details how to implement an NSPeristentStore that will give you an error every time.

Core Data Unit Testing - Unsure how to trigger error case in executeFetchRequest:error:

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I like this idea to just pretend there where no results if there was an error. But still I’d like to know what kinds of errors can happen. – Sven Jan 26 '13 at 11:20
    
Invalid request data (like entities or attributes not in the model) causes Core Data to raise exceptions. I have not found any instances where the standard persistent store types populate the error (instead of raising an exception) and returns nil. – Fruity Geek Jan 26 '13 at 15:55

You already found CoreDataErrors.h, also see the Core Data Constants Reference

Possible errors that could occur would be SQLite query errors for example. I vaguely remember seeing something like this, when I used an operation in a predicate that was translated into something not supported by the SQLite version backing core-data.

If caught during development you use the NSError purely to debug. If this happens at run time in an already released application an option would be to fail gracefully and if possible be ask the user to specify a different search format.

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First thing is to capture the error, but it entirely depends on the context of your code as to when you want to handle it gracefully or when you want to assert and stop anything else happening if things are going wrong.

Also remember that fetchedResults can return not nil, with no results (count == 0), which is not an error but you obviously might want to code against that.

NSError *fetchError = nil;
NSArray *fetchedResults = [context executeFetchRequest: request error: &fetchError];
if (fetchError) {
  NSLog(@"Error with fetch: %@",error);
  // Assert or do whatever is required ..
}

// Continue as normal ..
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2  
Cocoa requires that you check the direct return value before using the NSError, not whether the error is nil. The error is guaranteed to be valid if the method indicates failure, but the reverse -- that it will be nil for success -- is not guaranteed, even if you set it to nil beforehand. – Josh Caswell Jan 24 '13 at 18:40

I always pass these errors up to the NSResponder chain, thus:

NSManagedDocument _document;
NSManagedObjectContext _moc;

NSError *error = nil;
NSArray *result = [_managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:fr error:&error];
if (fetchedResults == nil && error) {
    [_document presentError:error];
    // or, if this isn't a document-based app, you can do
    // [NSApp presentError:error];
    // or, if this method is in an IBAction you can just do
    // [sender presentError:error];
    // and it'll just do the right thing
}

The default implementation in NSManagedDocument does an okay job of presenting these errors, except for situations when you are saving a doc and get multiple validation errors, in which case you need to write something special.

When in doubt, present NSError as soon as possible, and if you find yourself hard-coding a lot of retval checking for NSError, you problem might be more in what you're sending the error-returning function in the first place.

NSErrors, in general, are for users to resolve; NSExceptions are what the framework uses to let developers know what they need to deal with.

share|improve this answer
    
Cocoa requires that you check the direct return value before using the NSError, not whether the error is nil. The error is guaranteed to be valid if the method indicates failure, but the reverse -- that it will be nil for success -- is not guaranteed, even if you set it to nil beforehand. – Josh Caswell Jan 24 '13 at 18:36
    
You still don't need to check && error; if fetchedResults is nil, either the error is valid or something has gone much more deeply wrong. – Josh Caswell Jan 24 '13 at 22:43
    
Just displaying the error to the user is not very good if there is nothing the user can do about it. And for code that runs in the background (maybe syncing the local data store with a web service or something) I don’t want to disturb the user with an error alert that has nothing to do with what he is currently doing in my app. – Sven Jan 26 '13 at 11:22

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