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I have a class AudioClass in javascript to play audio as below: (pseudo code)

var AudioClass = function() {
     this.audioElement;
     .
     .
     .
     this.load = function(audioSource) {
         this.audioElement = //create Audio, set source etc.
         this.audioElement.addEventListener("loadedmetadata", function(){
                //some code
         });
     }

     this.play = function(from, to) {
         if(isNaN(this.audioElement.duration)) {    return; }  //line 1
         this.audioElement.currentTime = from/1000;   //line 2   //from & to in milliseconds  
         setTimeout(function() {
               //pause audio.
         }, to-from);
     }
}

And I am using the Audio as below:

/* the below lines are executed on document load. (playing background music) */
var audioInstance = new AudioClass();
audioInstance.load(audioSrc);
audioInstance.play(20000);   //line 3  //20 seconds

/* the below line is used at other places whenever i need sound */
audioInstance.play(40000);   //40 seconds

When I am trying to play audio at "line 3", sometimes audio is not loaded by that time, so it is throwing INVALID_STATE_ERR. DOM EXCEPTION 11 at line 2. When I checked the audio duration, it was NaN. So I added "line 1" to check whether the duration isNaN() or not, so that it doesn't try to set currentTime until the audio is loaded.

The problem here is sometimes the duration of audio is always NaN. How to fix this?

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FWIW: Audio is the name of native HTML5 Audio object. For your custom object, it makes sense to choose another name. –  Marat Tanalin Jan 24 '13 at 16:13
1  
you're not waiting for the audio to load, create a callback to play the it when it is finished loading –  Nicolas Brown Jan 24 '13 at 16:13
    
@Marat Tanalin I am not using "Audio" exactly. It is a psuedo code. –  Chaitanya Munipalle Jan 24 '13 at 16:17

2 Answers 2

You have to create a callback to play the audio when it loads. it works whenever you call audio.play in other places because the audio is loaded by then. Here is how i suggest you do it:

var Audio = function() {
     this.audioElement;
     .
     .
     .
     this.load = function(audioSource,callback) {
         this.audioElement = //create Audio, set source etc.
         this.audioElement.addEventListener("loadedmetadata", function(){
                //some code
                if(callback!=null)
                    callback();
         });
     }

     this.play = function(from, to) {
         if(isNaN(this.audioElement.duration)) {    return; }  //line 1
         this.audioElement.currentTime = from/1000;   //line 2   //from & to in milliseconds  
         setTimeout(function() {
               //pause audio.
         }, to-from);
     }
}

then use it like this:

var audio = new Audio();
audio.load(audioSrc,function()
{
audio.play(20000);  
});

an answer to a similar question shows how to preload all your audio (in the event you have others) before start using them: Proper onload for <audio>

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Play the sound in a callback registered to the loadeddata or even better, canplaythrough event of the audio element. (See javascript audio onload and similar questions.)

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