Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
 var source = new Bitmap(2000,2000);

        var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
        {
            //var copy = new Bitmap(source);
            var copy = source.Clone() as Bitmap;

        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

The code runs in under 10 ms with my System, and the Ram usage stayes the same. With this timer and Ram usage results there cannot be a copy of the Bitmapdata.

But when I do this.

        var copy2 = source.Clone() as Bitmap;

        for (int x = 0; x < copy2.Width; x++)
        {
            for (int y = 0; y < copy2.Height; y++)
            {
                copy2.SetPixel(x, y, Color.Red);
            }
        }

        // copy2 is Red
        // source is NOT!!

How is this possible?

share|improve this question
1  
For the first snippet, if copy isn't used, it's likely optimized away and never created in the first place. –  Austin Salonen Jan 24 '13 at 16:35
add comment

2 Answers

Your source is copied 10,000 times. The call to Clone() cannot be optimized away because the compiler does not know what side-effects the method call might have.

Of course, your clones are not kept, so the Garbage Collector may choose to get rid of them very soon (maybe while the loop is still running).

You can also keep the clones. Try this:

var source = new Bitmap(2000, 2000);
var li = new List<Bitmap>();
var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
    li.Add((Bitmap)source.Clone());
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

Console.WriteLine(li.Count);
li[4321].SetPixel(1234, 123, Color.Blue);
Console.WriteLine(li[1234].GetPixel(1234, 123)); // checks if a pixel of another clone also changed to blue

Edit: It does seem like the cloning is "lazy" in some sense. The above code runs very fast and doesn't use much memory. The same thing seems to happen even if source is a very complex bitmap, so it's not just something that happens when the source bitmap can be "compressed" very much.

If, after you build up the above list li, you run the following code:

var randomNumberGenerator = new Random();

for (int x = 0; x < 10000; ++x)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 2000; ++i)
        for (int j = 0; j < 2000; ++j)
            li[x].SetPixel(i, j, System.Drawing.Color.FromArgb(randomNumberGenerator.Next()));
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

you will see the memory consumption of the application rise slowly but steadily.

share|improve this answer
    
With my System sw.ElapsedMilliseconds shows 14ms and the ram usage climbes for roughly 100 MB. I can not believe that really every bitmap is cloned. –  Andreas Jan 24 '13 at 17:04
    
@Andreas I'm beginning to understand what you mean. See my edit above. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 24 '13 at 20:09
    
Reflector shows that the Clone method creates a new Bitmap object but sets only a handle to the original image and does not copy its contents. However, I cannot see what SetPixel does, since it calls a native GDI+ method. This lazy behavior is very astonishing. Interesting to know! –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 24 '13 at 20:19
add comment

The reason your first code snippet is running so quickly is very likely because the optimizer sees that copy is never used and just cuts it out. If you change your inner loop to:

var copy = source.Clone() as Bitmap;
var copy2 = copy;

...it will likely trick the compiler into actually generating IL code to clone the bitmap and you will see the elapsed time go up.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.