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When inserting or deleting an item from a UICollectionView, it seems like an extra cell appears during the animation, and this extra cell moves in the wrong direction. I've tried exactly the same with a UITableView, and there is no problem.

A video of the problem is here: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/11523469/CollectionViewBug.mov, with the collection view on the left and the table view on the right. The number in each cell is the indexPath.item value of the cell when the cell is created.

The problem is first noticeable in the video between 0:08 and 0:12 (insert) and then again at 0:16 to 0:20 (delete).

The project is available here: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/11523469/CollectionViewBug.zip

i.e. when inserting a cell, all cells below where the cell is being inserted move down to make room for the new cell. But this extra cell appears and overlaps the others and moves up.

Likewise, when deleting a cell, all cells below the cell being deleted move up to fill the gap where the cell used to be. But this extra cell appears and overlaps the others and moves down.

The first action to be performed on the collection view, either insert or delete, does not cause this problem. But on all subsequent actions the problem is there.

Has anyone else experienced the same problem with UICollectionView? Does anyone have a solution or workaround?

Thanks!

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I came up with a workaround which seems to fix the problem but is very specific to the example provided. My guess is that when cells are reused they have the wrong starting point which causes the weird animations.

I changed the Storyboard to use a subclass of UICollectionViewFlowLayout:

// MyFlowLayout - subclass of UICollectionViewFlowLayout

#import "MyFlowLayout.h"

@interface MyFlowLayout ()

@property (strong) NSMutableArray *deleteIndexPaths;
@property (strong) NSMutableArray *insertIndexPaths;
@property (assign) float rowOffset;

@end

@implementation MyFlowLayout

-(id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)aDecoder
{
    if (self = [super initWithCoder:aDecoder])
    {
        // minimumInteritemSpacing may be adjusted upwards but this example ignores that
        self.rowOffset = self.itemSize.height + self.minimumInteritemSpacing;
    }

    return self;
}

// As per Mark Pospesel corrections to CircleLayout

- (void)prepareForCollectionViewUpdates:(NSArray *)updateItems
{
    // Keep track of insert and delete index paths
    [super prepareForCollectionViewUpdates:updateItems];

    self.deleteIndexPaths = [NSMutableArray array];
    self.insertIndexPaths = [NSMutableArray array];

    for (UICollectionViewUpdateItem *update in updateItems)
    {
        if (update.updateAction == UICollectionUpdateActionDelete)
        {
            [self.deleteIndexPaths addObject:update.indexPathBeforeUpdate];
        }
        else if (update.updateAction == UICollectionUpdateActionInsert)
        {
            [self.insertIndexPaths addObject:update.indexPathAfterUpdate];
        }
    }
}

- (void)finalizeCollectionViewUpdates
{
    [super finalizeCollectionViewUpdates];
    // release the insert and delete index paths
    self.deleteIndexPaths = nil;
    self.insertIndexPaths = nil;
}

// The next two methods have misleading names as they get called for all visible cells on     both insert and delete

- (UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes *)initialLayoutAttributesForAppearingItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)itemIndexPath
{
    // Must call super
    UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes *attributes = [super initialLayoutAttributesForAppearingItemAtIndexPath:itemIndexPath];
    if (!attributes)
        attributes = [self layoutAttributesForItemAtIndexPath:itemIndexPath];

    if ([self.insertIndexPaths containsObject:itemIndexPath]) {
        // Initial position for an inserted cell is it's final position - fades in
        CGRect frame = attributes.frame;
        frame.origin.y = itemIndexPath.row * self.rowOffset;
        attributes.frame = frame;
        attributes.zIndex = -1; // stop the inserted cell bleeding through too early in the animation
    }
    if ([self.deleteIndexPaths count]) {
        NSIndexPath *deletedPath = self.deleteIndexPaths[0];  // Might be more than one but this example ignores that
        if (itemIndexPath.row > deletedPath.row) {
            // Anything after the deleted cell needs to slide up from the position below it's final position
            // Anything before the deleted cell doesn't need adjusting
            CGRect frame = attributes.frame;
            frame.origin.y = ((itemIndexPath.row + 1) * self.rowOffset);
            attributes.frame = frame;
        }
    }

    return attributes;
}

- (UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes *)finalLayoutAttributesForDisappearingItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)itemIndexPath
{
    UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes *attributes = [super finalLayoutAttributesForDisappearingItemAtIndexPath:itemIndexPath];
    if (!attributes)
        attributes = [self layoutAttributesForItemAtIndexPath:itemIndexPath];

    // I would have expected the final positions to already be correct but my guess is that re-used cells
    // are not considered until after the animation block settings have been generated
    CGRect frame = attributes.frame;
    frame.origin.y = itemIndexPath.row * self.rowOffset;
    attributes.frame = frame;

    if ([self.deleteIndexPaths containsObject:itemIndexPath]) {
        // Fade out the deleted cell
        attributes.alpha = 0.0;
    }

    return attributes;
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, it worked (with a few tweaks for my actual project). Would you agree that this is a bug in iOS? Surely this isn't the expected behaviour? –  Sam Jan 29 '13 at 9:52
    
Yeah I'd call it a bug. I'm fairly certain it's only the reused cells that have the unexpected animation behaviour. –  Gareth Jan 29 '13 at 15:24
    
Thank you for posting this. Tremendously useful. –  Dan Mar 27 '13 at 16:03
    
Don't know why, but this did not fix my issue. The cell after insert first renders on first insert position and then it moves to correct positions. It looks pretty ugly... I couldn't find any solution for this... Doesn't make sense why apple didn't fix this... Thanks for any advice. Martin. –  Pion Mar 4 at 21:17
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If somebody came here looking for a MonoTouch answer, here's what I got by translating Gareth's answer.

A base class, defining EnableAnimationFix and two virtual methods: ApplyAnimationFixToAppearingItem and ApplyAnimationFixToDisappearingItem.

public class CollectionViewFlowLayout : UICollectionViewFlowLayout
{   
    protected List<int> _insertedItems = new List<int> ();
    protected List<int> _deletedItems = new List<int> ();

    protected virtual bool EnableAnimationFix {
        get { return false; }
    }

    protected virtual void ApplyAnimationFixToAppearingItem (int index, UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes attrs)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException ();
    }

    protected virtual void ApplyAnimationFixToDisappearingItem (int index, UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes attrs)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException ();
    }

    public override UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes InitialLayoutAttributesForAppearingItem (NSIndexPath path)
    {
        var attrs = base.InitialLayoutAttributesForAppearingItem (path);
        if (!EnableAnimationFix) {
            return attrs;
        }

        attrs = attrs ?? LayoutAttributesForItem (path);
        if (attrs != null)
            ApplyAnimationFixToAppearingItem (path.Row, attrs);

        return attrs;
    }

    public override UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes FinalLayoutAttributesForDisappearingItem (NSIndexPath path)
    {
        var attrs = base.FinalLayoutAttributesForDisappearingItem (path);
        if (!EnableAnimationFix) {
            return attrs;
        }

        if (attrs == null && _deletedItems.Contains (path.Row)) {
            // Calling LayoutAttributesForItem will cause an exception so we return now.
            // I think this happens when last and only item is deleted, and there are no other cells in cell pool.
            return null;
        }

        attrs = attrs ?? LayoutAttributesForItem (path);
        if (attrs != null)
            ApplyAnimationFixToDisappearingItem (path.Row, attrs);

        return attrs;
    }

    public override void PrepareForCollectionViewUpdates (UICollectionViewUpdateItem [] updateItems)
    {
        base.PrepareForCollectionViewUpdates (updateItems);

        if (!EnableAnimationFix)
            return;

        _insertedItems.Clear ();
        _deletedItems.Clear ();

        foreach (var update in updateItems) {
            if (update.UpdateAction == UICollectionUpdateAction.Insert) {
                _insertedItems.Add (update.IndexPathAfterUpdate.Row);
            } else if (update.UpdateAction == UICollectionUpdateAction.Delete) {
                _deletedItems.Add (update.IndexPathBeforeUpdate.Row);
            }
        }
    }

    public override void FinalizeCollectionViewUpdates ()
    {
        base.FinalizeCollectionViewUpdates ();

        if (!EnableAnimationFix)
            return;

        _insertedItems.Clear ();
        _deletedItems.Clear ();
    }
}

And there goes my actual collection view layout code:

public class DraftsLayout : CollectionViewFlowLayout
{

    // ... 


    protected override bool EnableAnimationFix {
        get { return true; }
    }

    protected override void ApplyAnimationFixToAppearingItem (int index, UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes attrs)
    {
        if (_insertedItems.Contains (index)) {
            SetXByIndex (attrs, index);
            attrs.ZIndex = -1;
        }

        int deletedToTheLeft = _deletedItems.Count (i => i < index);
        if (deletedToTheLeft > 0) {
            SetXByIndex (attrs, index + deletedToTheLeft);
        }
    }

    protected override void ApplyAnimationFixToDisappearingItem (int index, UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes attrs)
    {
        SetXByIndex (attrs, index);

        if (_deletedItems.Contains (index)) {
            attrs.Alpha = 0;
        }
    }

    const int SnapStep = 150;
    static void SetXByIndex (UICollectionViewLayoutAttributes attrs, int index)
    {
        var frame = attrs.Frame;
        frame.X = index * SnapStep;
        attrs.Frame = frame;
    }
}

Note that this code should potentially handle several deletes in a batch nicely.
Kudos to Gareth.

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I've been running across all sorts of odd animation behavior surrounding using reloadData or reloadItemsAtIndexPaths. When I don't use those methods, the animation behavior seems to work as advertised.

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