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I have this expression

(*p % 3 != 0) ? *p = (*p) + 1 : *p = (*p) + 2;

In Turbo C++ it evaluates to 14 if *p is 11 and to 35 if *p is 33

In GCC (Windows) it evaluates to 12 and 35 respectively which is what is expected

It works fine when parenthesized to the following format:

(*p % 3 != 0) ? (*p = (*p) + 1) : (*p = (*p) + 2); 

Is there any explanation for this difference? I'm guessing it comes down to differences in the precedence order used by the compilers but cannot pinpoint the root cause

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What happens if you add parentheses everywhere? –  StilesCrisis Jan 24 '13 at 17:15
    
It works fine then, which is what led me to believe a precedence issue –  Akash Jan 24 '13 at 17:15
    
I think Turbo C++ must be binding % tighter than *... OK, maybe not. The parenthesized version does nothing with *p%3 –  emsr Jan 24 '13 at 17:17
    
That doesn't explain why parenthesizing the assignments fixes it. –  StilesCrisis Jan 24 '13 at 17:18
2  
Why do you write code like this in the first place? Is this for a obfuscated C contest? If anything, write *p += (*p % 3) ? 2 : 1; which is at least somewhat more readable. Though if would really be preferrable (I'm not even sure if all these dereferences on both sides of assignments aren't triggering UB...). –  Damon Jan 24 '13 at 17:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The ternary conditional operator is different in C and in C++. The expression a ? b : c = d is parsed...

  • as (a ? b : c) = d in C, and

  • as a ? b : (c = d) in C++.

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