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And if so, under what conditions? Or, phrased alternately, is it safe to run this code inside of twisted:

class StatsdClient(AbstractStatsdClient):
  def __init__(self, host, port):
    super(StatsdClient, self).__init__()
    self.addr = (host, port)
    self.server_hostname = socket.gethostname()
    self.udp_sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)

  def incr(self, stat, amount=1):
    data = {"%s|c" % stat: amount}
    self._send(data)

  def _send(self, data):
    for stat, value in data.iteritems():
      self.udp_sock.sendto("servers.%s.%s:%s" % (self.server_hostname, stat, value), self.addr)
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I believe it is blocking by default and you have to use self.udp_sock.setblocking(0) to set it to nonblocking, in which case it will raise an exception if it cannot send the data immediately. –  imreal Jan 24 '13 at 17:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, oddly, a UDP socket can block.

The conditions under which this can happen are basically, some buffers somewhere fill up, your operating system decides it's time for something to block. These are arguably kernel bugs, but I've seen them here and there. You can definitely get EWOULDBLOCK sometimes under obscure, impossible-to-reproduce conditions.

Why would you want to do this in Twisted instead of using Twisted's built-in UDP support though?

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3  
Also, Python-specifically, if "host" needs to be resolved, then Python will happily do that resolution for you, blockingly, regardless of the state of the UDP socket. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jan 24 '13 at 18:23
2  
Oh yea, and sort of related-ish, I guess, socket.gethostname can block too! –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jan 24 '13 at 18:24

It could fail if your network interface goes down, for example:

[ENETDOWN] The local network interface used to reach the destination is down.

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2  
That's a failure condition, not a blocking condition. –  zigg Jan 24 '13 at 18:03
    
Doh, true that, sorry, I misread. –  saghul Jan 24 '13 at 18:06

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