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I'm new to this kind of stuff so I'd like some design suggestions. Let's say I have something like this

$(function () {
    $('#menuBtn').on('click', app.openUsersMenu);
});
var app = {
    users: null,
    openUsersMenu: function () {
        if (app.users != null) {
            //render menu
        } else {
            $.ajax({
                url: '/getUsers.json'
            }).success(function (data) {
                app.users = data;
                //render menu     
            });
        }
    }
}

Is it a good way of doing lazy loading and caching or would you suggest better alternatives? What's the usal solution to avoid writing the rendering function twice? Of course you could have something like:

var app = {
    users: null,
    openUsersMenu: function() {
        if (app.users != null) {
            app.renderMenu();
        } else {
            $.ajax({
                url: '/getUsers.json'
            }).success(function (data) {
                app.users = data;
                app.renderMenu();  
            });
        }
    },
    renderMenu: function() {
        //use app.users to render
    }
}

But then the two function and their names become rather confusing so could be better do something like:

var app = {
    users: null,
    openUsersMenu: function () {
        if (app.users != null) {
            //render menu
        } else {
            $.ajax({
                url: '/getUsers.json'
            }).success(function (data) {
                app.users = data;
                app.openUsersMenu(); // Call itself, now with data    
            });
        }
    }
}

Is the last pattern a good idea? What's kind of the usual way of doing this?

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1  
Use the middle one. It's easier to understand. –  Lee Meador Jan 24 '13 at 17:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm sure you'll get lots of suggestions for different libraries and such that could be used for caching (such as amplifyJS), and they have their place. But if all that you're doing is caching in-memory, then your solution is perfectly fine. Under the covers, that's what a library will do anyway for in-memory caching - just abstracted out a bit.

But, what you have is simple, easy to understand, and most of all it works.

Concerning your different options for loading/caching your code. If renderMenu is never to be called directly, I would move it inside of openUsersMenu to make it private:

var app = {
    users: null,
    openUsersMenu: function() {
        var renderMenu = function() {
            //use app.users to render
        };

        if (app.users != null) {
            renderMenu();
        } else {
            $.ajax({
                url: '/getUsers/json'
            }).success(function (data) {
                app.users = data;
                renderMenu();  
            });
        }
    }
}

Otherwise, Option #2 is peachy. Lee Meador is right, Option #3 is cool, but a little hard to read. Let me know if you need any further clarification.

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