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I am getting a segfault when dereferencing an iterator which has been initiallized to list.begin().

list<data>::iterator it;
for(int i=0; i< n; i++)    
{
    it = (list_empty[i]).begin();
    while(it != (list_empty[i]).end())
    {
        cout<<"PROBLEM HERE: size="<<it->process.size<<endl;
        //cout<<"log file i="<<i<<endl;
        log_file_start(current_time, it,"list of empty");
        it++;
    }
}

This is the error from the gdb:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
[Switching to process 2888]
0x0804ecc0 in log_file_buddy (list_delay=..., list_vp=..., 
    list_empty=0x805a00c, method=..., current_time=0, n=10)
    at fuctions_of_mm.cpp:425 
425         cout<<"PROBLEM HERE: size="<<it->process.size << endl;

Output of gdb with bt full, shows that iterator is NULL.

(gdb) bt full
#0  0x0804ecc0 in log_file_buddy (list_delay=..., list_vp=..., 
    list_empty=0x805a00c, method=..., current_time=0, n=10)
    at fuctions_of_mm.cpp:425
        i = 8
        it = {_M_node = 0x0}
        out = <incomplete type>

Although the iterator is NULL, the it != (list_empty[i]).end() is evaluated. what is wrong?

EDIT: Sorry for the omission. This is it: list_empty = new list<data>[n]; N is a parameter given, representing this: 2^{N} = Size_of_Memory

EDIT #2: This is the definition:

typedef struct data{
    int position;
    vp proccess;
    int delay;
    int current_life;
    int time_start;
    int time_stop;
    int part_of_memory; 
    bool operator ==(const data& st)
    {
      return proccess.pid == st.proccess.pid;
    }
}data;

And the definition of vp:

    typedef struct {
    int size;
    int pid;//prosdiorisths diergasias
 }vp

And a value for n: n = 10.

the declaration of list_empty is list< data > *list_empty; .

share|improve this question
8  
What is list_empty? –  John Kugelman Jan 24 '13 at 17:38
    
It looks like list_empty[8] is not a valid std::list object. How was it created, and what happened to it between creation and this code? –  Mike Seymour Jan 24 '13 at 17:45
    
Also, where does n come from? –  Mike Seymour Jan 24 '13 at 17:46
    
What is list_empty? Is it a container of containers of some sort? Why do you need an unused it_empty variable? Is this your real code? –  n.m. Jan 24 '13 at 17:46
    
@JohnKugelman: I've added the declaration of list_empty, sorry for the omission. –  user2008313 Jan 24 '13 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

This works for me:

#include <list>
using std::list;

const int n = 10;

typedef struct {
    int size;
    int pid;//prosdiorisths diergasias
}vp;


typedef struct data{
    int position;
    vp process;
    int delay;
    int current_life;
    int time_start;
    int time_stop;
    int part_of_memory;
    bool operator ==(const data& st)
    {
    return process.pid == st.process.pid;
    }
}data;

int main()
{

    list<data>* list_empty = new list<data>[n];
    list<data>::iterator it;
    for(int i=0; i< n; i++)
    {
        it = (list_empty[i]).begin();
        while(it != (list_empty[i]).end())
        {
            cout<<"PROBLEM HERE: size="<<it->process.size<<endl;
            //cout<<"log file i="<<i<<endl;
            //log_file_start(current_time, it,"list of empty");
            it++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

What is it?

it_empty = new list<data>::iterator[n];
for(int i=0; i< n; i++)    
{
    auto it = (list_empty[i]).begin();
    while(it != (list_empty[i]).end())
    {
        cout<<"PROBLEM HERE: size="<<it->process.size<<endl;
        //cout<<"log file i="<<i<<endl;
        log_file_start(current_time, it,"list of empty");
        it++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
list < data >::iterator it; –  user2008313 Jan 24 '13 at 19:25
    
@user2008313 : Ok. Good. With what code actualy have you the error? Is now OK? Or is still broken? –  qPCR4vir Jan 24 '13 at 20:42

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