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I have a data frame with a hierarchical index in axis 1 (columns) (from a groupby.agg operation):

     USAF   WBAN  year  month  day  s_PC  s_CL  s_CD  s_CNT  tempf       
                                     sum   sum   sum    sum   amax   amin
0  702730  26451  1993      1    1     1     0    12     13  30.92  24.98
1  702730  26451  1993      1    2     0     0    13     13  32.00  24.98
2  702730  26451  1993      1    3     1    10     2     13  23.00   6.98
3  702730  26451  1993      1    4     1     0    12     13  10.04   3.92
4  702730  26451  1993      1    5     3     0    10     13  19.94  10.94

I want to flatten it, so that it looks like this (names aren't critical - I could rename):

     USAF   WBAN  year  month  day  s_PC  s_CL  s_CD  s_CNT  tempf_amax  tmpf_amin   
0  702730  26451  1993      1    1     1     0    12     13  30.92          24.98
1  702730  26451  1993      1    2     0     0    13     13  32.00          24.98
2  702730  26451  1993      1    3     1    10     2     13  23.00          6.98
3  702730  26451  1993      1    4     1     0    12     13  10.04          3.92
4  702730  26451  1993      1    5     3     0    10     13  19.94          10.94

How do I do this? (I've tried a lot, to no avail.)

Per a suggestion, here is the head in dict form

{('USAF', ''): {0: '702730',
  1: '702730',
  2: '702730',
  3: '702730',
  4: '702730'},
 ('WBAN', ''): {0: '26451', 1: '26451', 2: '26451', 3: '26451', 4: '26451'},
 ('day', ''): {0: 1, 1: 2, 2: 3, 3: 4, 4: 5},
 ('month', ''): {0: 1, 1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 1, 4: 1},
 ('s_CD', 'sum'): {0: 12.0, 1: 13.0, 2: 2.0, 3: 12.0, 4: 10.0},
 ('s_CL', 'sum'): {0: 0.0, 1: 0.0, 2: 10.0, 3: 0.0, 4: 0.0},
 ('s_CNT', 'sum'): {0: 13.0, 1: 13.0, 2: 13.0, 3: 13.0, 4: 13.0},
 ('s_PC', 'sum'): {0: 1.0, 1: 0.0, 2: 1.0, 3: 1.0, 4: 3.0},
 ('tempf', 'amax'): {0: 30.920000000000002,
  1: 32.0,
  2: 23.0,
  3: 10.039999999999999,
  4: 19.939999999999998},
 ('tempf', 'amin'): {0: 24.98,
  1: 24.98,
  2: 6.9799999999999969,
  3: 3.9199999999999982,
  4: 10.940000000000001},
 ('year', ''): {0: 1993, 1: 1993, 2: 1993, 3: 1993, 4: 1993}}
share|improve this question
2  
can you add the output of df[:5].to_dict() as an example for others to read in your dataset? –  Zelazny7 Jan 24 '13 at 18:18
    
Good idea. Did it above since it was too long for the comment. –  Ross R Jan 24 '13 at 18:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I think the easiest way to do this would be to set the columns to the top level:

df.columns = df.columns.get_level_values(0)

Note: if the to level has a name you can also access it by this, rather than 0.

.

If you want to combine/join your MultiIndex into one Index (assuming you have just string entries in your columns) you could:

df.columns = [' '.join(col).strip() for col in df.columns.values]

Note: we must strip the whitespace for when there is no second index.

In [11]: [' '.join(col).strip() for col in df.columns.values]
Out[11]: 
['USAF',
 'WBAN',
 'day',
 'month',
 's_CD sum',
 's_CL sum',
 's_CNT sum',
 's_PC sum',
 'tempf amax',
 'tempf amin',
 'year']
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! I'll leave this open a bit to see if there are other ways (so I can learn), but this works great. Thank you so much. –  Ross R Jan 24 '13 at 18:40
    
Actually, here's a follow-up problem: How do I rename the two columns that have the same column names? (col 4 & 5 are both named 'tempf'). The df.rename() function uses a dictionary based on name, i believe. –  Ross R Jan 24 '13 at 19:00
    
@RossR That's a good question, I suggest asking this as a new question :) –  Andy Hayden Jan 24 '13 at 19:01
    
@RossR updated answer with way to combine. –  Andy Hayden Jan 24 '13 at 19:27
    
elegant solution for generating the contracted labels -- +1 –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 24 '13 at 19:28

Andy Hayden's answer is certainly the easiest way -- if you want to avoid duplicate column labels you need to tweak a bit

In [34]: df
Out[34]: 
     USAF   WBAN  day  month  s_CD  s_CL  s_CNT  s_PC  tempf         year
                               sum   sum    sum   sum   amax   amin      
0  702730  26451    1      1    12     0     13     1  30.92  24.98  1993
1  702730  26451    2      1    13     0     13     0  32.00  24.98  1993
2  702730  26451    3      1     2    10     13     1  23.00   6.98  1993
3  702730  26451    4      1    12     0     13     1  10.04   3.92  1993
4  702730  26451    5      1    10     0     13     3  19.94  10.94  1993


In [35]: mi = df.columns

In [36]: mi
Out[36]: 
MultiIndex
[(USAF, ), (WBAN, ), (day, ), (month, ), (s_CD, sum), (s_CL, sum), (s_CNT, sum), (s_PC, sum), (tempf, amax), (tempf, amin), (year, )]


In [37]: mi.tolist()
Out[37]: 
[('USAF', ''),
 ('WBAN', ''),
 ('day', ''),
 ('month', ''),
 ('s_CD', 'sum'),
 ('s_CL', 'sum'),
 ('s_CNT', 'sum'),
 ('s_PC', 'sum'),
 ('tempf', 'amax'),
 ('tempf', 'amin'),
 ('year', '')]

In [38]: ind = pd.Index([e[0] + e[1] for e in mi.tolist()])

In [39]: ind
Out[39]: Index([USAF, WBAN, day, month, s_CDsum, s_CLsum, s_CNTsum, s_PCsum, tempfamax, tempfamin, year], dtype=object)

In [40]: df.columns = ind




In [46]: df
Out[46]: 
     USAF   WBAN  day  month  s_CDsum  s_CLsum  s_CNTsum  s_PCsum  tempfamax  tempfamin  \
0  702730  26451    1      1       12        0        13        1      30.92      24.98   
1  702730  26451    2      1       13        0        13        0      32.00      24.98   
2  702730  26451    3      1        2       10        13        1      23.00       6.98   
3  702730  26451    4      1       12        0        13        1      10.04       3.92   
4  702730  26451    5      1       10        0        13        3      19.94      10.94   




   year  
0  1993  
1  1993  
2  1993  
3  1993  
4  1993
share|improve this answer

And if you want to retain any of the aggregation info from the second level of the multiindex you can try this:

In [1]: [''.join(t) for t in df.columns]
Out[1]:
['USAF',
 'WBAN',
 'day',
 'month',
 's_CDsum',
 's_CLsum',
 's_CNTsum',
 's_PCsum',
 'tempfamax',
 'tempfamin',
 'year']

In [2]: df.columns = new_cols
share|improve this answer

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