Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a procedure that gathers data for all given files. I want the procedure to be used for multiple files. You should be able to give the procedure any number of files, say 25 to it and it goes and gathers all of the data for these files.

Scripts to gather data from the individual tables is pretty easy to write. One of them is below:

     select * From Table_name a
          Where a.FILE_ID in  pi_fileid 
          and a.FILE_TYPE = 'L';

I also tried testing as shown below:

    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE  'select count(*) from Table_name 
                        where file_id in (' || pi_fileid || ')  
                        AND file_type = ''L'' 
                        AND status = ''FP''' INTO cnt;

pi_fileid is the varchar with file names in it. They would be comma delimited.

My Procedure execute call looks like this:

DECLARE 
  PI_FILETYPE VARCHAR2(200);
  PI_DATE DATE;
  PI_FILEID VARCHAR2(200);

BEGIN 
  PI_FILETYPE := 'BLA_BLA';
  PI_DATE := '30-dec-2009';
  PI_FILEID := (''Z1100E71g'' ,''Y1100E71g'');

  GATHER_PKG.GATHEREFILE ( PI_FILETYPE, PI_DATE, PI_FILEID );
  COMMIT; 
END; 

But, from the looks of it, this does not gather anything from the database as the server appears to be thinking I'm looking for ''Z1100E71g.def'', instead of 'Z1100E71g.def'. So, this returns nothing.

Is there a way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Are you allowed to change the definition of your procedure? Could you pass in a proper collection rather than trying to pass in a comma-delimited VARCHAR2? –  Justin Cave Jan 24 '13 at 18:28
    
this is a brand new package I'm writing ... so I can make any kind of changes I could ... can you elaborate what you were thinking? –  Dash Jan 24 '13 at 18:30

1 Answer 1

best is to use an sql array:

SQL> create type file_id_tab as table of varchar2(20);
  2  /

Type created.

SQL> create or replace package GATHER_PKG
  2  as
  3    procedure gatherfile(pi_filetype table_name.file_type%type,
  4                         pi_date     date,
  5                         pi_fileid   file_id_tab);
  6  end;
  7  /

Package created.

SQL> create or replace  package body GATHER_PKG
  2  as
  3    procedure gatherfile(pi_filetype table_name.file_type%type,
  4                         pi_date     date,
  5                         pi_fileid   file_id_tab)
  6    is
  7      v_cnt number;
  8    begin
  9
 10      select count(*)
 11        into v_cnt
 12        from table_name
 13       where file_id in (select /*+ cardinality(p, 10) */ p.column_value
 14                           from table(pi_fileid) p)
 15         and file_type = pi_filetype
 16         and status = 'FP';
 17
 18      dbms_output.put_line(v_cnt);
 19    end;
 20  end;
 21  /

Package body created.

SQL> DECLARE
  2    PI_FILETYPE VARCHAR2(200);
  3    PI_DATE DATE;
  4    PI_FILEID file_id_tab;
  5
  6  BEGIN
  7    PI_FILETYPE := 'BLA_BLA';
  8    PI_DATE := '30-dec-2009';
  9    PI_FILEID := file_id_tab('Z1100E71g' ,'Y1100E71g');
 10
 11    GATHER_PKG.GATHERFILE ( PI_FILETYPE, PI_DATE, PI_FILEID );
 12    COMMIT;
 13  END;
 14  /
2

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

the cardinality hint /*+ cardinality(p, 10) */ is used to tell oracle teh approx number of rows. It's best to set that to an approx number that you expect the array to hold (as oracle will default to a card guess of 8k otherwise)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.