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I have a 2D numpy array made from zeros and ones that I use as a mask for other arrays. I was trying to use matplotlib.contour to highlight an area on a plot, but every time I try it I get a zero-size array to minimum.reduce without identity error. Any idea?

Since this mask is a set of rectangles, I tried to find the edges manually, but it does not work properly. Here's the code I use:

tmp1,tmp2 = [],[]
for ii in range(len(mask))[1:-2]:
    if mask[ii+1] - mask[ii] != 1: tmp1.append(mask[ii])
if mask[ii] - mask[ii-1] != 1: tmp2.append(mask[ii]-1)


rect_limits = []
for ii in range(len(tmp1)):
    rect_limits.append([- delta_cont, tmp1[ii], delta_cont, tmp2[ii]])

that way tmp1 and tmp2 should give me the max and min of the rectangles I am searching for. (the lateral edges of the rectangle are fixed, so no problem there).

then I just need to use add_patch to create the contour of the rectangles I want.

Any alternative idea to find the rectangle edges?

Edit:

OK, so my mask would be something like:

[[0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0],      
[0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0],
[0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0]]

and ideally what I would like as a result would be:

[[1,3],[6,9]]

ie, an array built with

[[y_start1,y_end1],[y_start2,y_end2],...]
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1  
So mask is the 2D array of zeros and ones? Could you give a concrete example (e.g. a 5x5 array) with the result that you expect? –  Warren Weckesser Jan 24 '13 at 21:49
    
@ Warren Weckesser: OK, so my mask would be something like: [[0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0], [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0]] and ideally what I would like as a result would be: [[1,3],[6,9]] ie, an array bult with [[y_start1,y_end1],[y_start2,y_end2],...] –  jorgehumberto Jan 25 '13 at 11:28
    
Can two or more rectangles be side by side? –  Mike Jan 25 '13 at 11:52
    
@Mike: When side by side they will work as one rectangle. –  jorgehumberto Jan 25 '13 at 12:54
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

answer.py

mygrid = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0]]

def findEdges(grid)
    y_start = -1
    saved = []
    for lineno, row in enumerate(grid):
        # Case where we don't have a start point
        if y_start == -1 and 1 in row:
            y_start = lineno
        # Case where we have a start point and we just hit a zero row
        if y_start != -1 and 1 not in row:           
            saved.append((y_start, lineno-1))
            y_start = -1
        # Case where we have a start point and hit the end of the table
        if lineno == len(grid)-1 and y_start > 0:
            saved.append((y_start, lineno))

    return saved

print(findEdges(mygrid))

This gives an output of:

mike@example ~ $ python answer.py
[(1, 3), (6, 9)]

Note: This won't work if two or more rectangles are allowed to be side by side on the grid.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Mike, works perfectly, thanks! Now I can use these values to draw the contour of the mask on the plot! :) –  jorgehumberto Jan 25 '13 at 12:55
    
@jorgehumberto I'm glad it worked for you. If this is an adequate solution please select it as the right answer so that the question can be closed out. –  Mike Jan 25 '13 at 21:05
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