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Say I have the following schema:

-- Create the dbo.Transaction table
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Transaction] (
    [TransactionId] INT NOT NULL IDENTITY,
    [AccountId] INT NOT NULL,
    [TransactionDate] DateTime2(7) NOT NULL,
    [Amount] decimal(9,3) NOT NULL
    CONSTRAINT [PK_Transaction] PRIMARY KEY ([TransactionId])
);

And the following query:

Select
    AccountId,
    TransactionDate,
    Amount,
    AverageAmount       = Avg(Amount)   Over (Partition By AccountId Order By TransactionDate ROWS BETWEEN 2 PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW),
    TransactionCount    = Count(Amount) Over (Partition By AccountId Order By TransactionDate ROWS 2 PRECEDING),
    MinimumAmount       = Min(Amount)   Over (Partition By AccountId Order By TransactionDate ROWS 2 PRECEDING),
    MaximumAmount       = Max(Amount)   Over (Partition By AccountId Order By TransactionDate ROWS 2 PRECEDING),
    SumAmount           = Sum(Amount)   Over (Partition By AccountId Order By TransactionDate ROWS 2 PRECEDING)
From dbo.[Transaction]
Order By AccountId, TransactionDate

How would I perform this query if it were contained in a UDF or stored proc, and the sliding interval (2 in this example) wasn't known until runtime, as passed as a parameter to the UDF / stored proc? It seems SQL 2012 doesn't permit the use of a variable here.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As you mentioned, SQL Server only supports integer literals for PRECEDING and FOLLOWING in OVER clauses.

There are two options available to you: dynamic sql and re-writing the query to not use PRECEDING

Dynamic sql is the simpliest, but I'd be careful about putting it in a UDF.

set @sql = N'Select AccountId, ... ROWS ' 
          + cast(@sz as varchar(10)) + N' PRECEDING) ...'
exec sp_executesql @sql

However window functions are just fancy syntax. You can re-write the query without them:

DECLARE @sz INT
SET @sz = 2

;
WITH    q AS ( SELECT   AccountId ,
                        TransactionDate ,
                        Amount ,
                        ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY AccountId 
                                            ORDER BY TransactionDate ) rw
               FROM     [Transaction]
             )
    SELECT  accountID ,
            TransactionDate ,
            Amount ,
            ( SELECT    AVG(q1.Amount) FROM  q q1
              WHERE     q1.accountid = q.accountid
                        AND q1.rw BETWEEN q.rw - @sz AND q.rw
            ) AverageAmount,
            ( SELECT    COUNT(q1.Amount) FROM  q q1
              WHERE     q1.accountid = q.accountid
                        AND q1.rw BETWEEN q.rw - @sz AND q.rw
            ) TransactionAmount
            -- etc.
            FROM q
            ORDER BY AccountID, TransactionDate

Here is another way to re-write the query as well:

DECLARE @sz INT
SET @sz = 2;
WITH    q AS ( SELECT   AccountId ,
                        TransactionDate ,
                        Amount ,
                        ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY AccountId 
                                            ORDER BY TransactionDate ) rw
               FROM     [Transaction]
             )
    SELECT  q.accountID ,
            q.TransactionDate ,
            q.Amount ,
            AVG(q1.Amount) AverageAmount ,
            COUNT(q1.Amount) TransactionAmount ,
            MAX(q1.Amount) MaxAmount ,
            MIN(q1.Amount) MinAmount
                -- etc.
    FROM    q
            INNER JOIN q q1 ON q1.accountid = q.accountid
                               AND q1.rw BETWEEN q.rw - @sz AND q.rw
    GROUP BY q.accountid ,
            q.transactiondate ,
            q.amount
share|improve this answer
    
Clever workaround but calling the window functions for "fancy syntax" is a bit unfair. With windows functions the query uses a windows spool to do the job of the moving window and since the over clause is identical for all aggregates there will be only one table scan (or index scan if you have a covering index). You workaround will have 6 table/index scans. Huge difference. –  Mikael Eriksson Jan 26 '13 at 9:28
    
My point with referring to PRECEDING as fancy syntax is that it is possible to write a logically equivalent query without using the syntax. I also added an additional way to re-write the query to reduce the number of scans. Yes, Sql may give a better physical plan when using PRECEDING, but logically the queries are the same. –  StrayCatDBA Jan 26 '13 at 17:40

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