Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to validate my domain objects before I pass them on to a other part of the system. All the objects that I want to validate share the same interface. The problem is that I can't figure out how to write this in a good way. I don't want to move the validation inside my value object. But I don't want to be forced to do a instanceOf-check either.

An example:

public interface Vehicle {}

public class Car implements Vehicle {}

public class MotorBike implements Vehicle {}

public interface VehicleValidator {
    void validate();

}

public class CarValidator implements VehicleValidator {

    @Override
    public void validate() {}
}

public class MotorBikeValidator implements VehicleValidator {

    @Override
    public void validate() {}
}

public void process(Vehicle vehicle) {
    //TODO: validate vehicle
    doSomething(vehicle);
}

In Scala I would have done something similar to http://debasishg.blogspot.se/2010/06/scala-implicits-type-classes-here-i.html But those language constructs is not possible in Java.

share|improve this question
2  
It sounds a lot like you're asking about the visitor pattern. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 24 '13 at 19:20
    
Why don't you want to put the validation method in the value object? As it is, even if you clean up the interface hierarchy you are still going to need to chain the validator implementations, in order to support the natural hierarchy of the value objects. –  Perception Jan 24 '13 at 19:24
    
Out of curiosity, is there a reason you against using an instanceOf in this scenario? –  Zylth Jan 24 '13 at 19:26
1  
@Zylth using instanceOf is generally frowned upon - javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=31 –  Kyle Rogers Jan 24 '13 at 19:27

3 Answers 3

As Oli Charlesworth wrote in his comment, this is usually done by Visitor pattern. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitor_pattern

There is good java example on that wiki page.

share|improve this answer

Your best bet is a strategy pattern imo, however this won't get you away from doing instanceof/isAssignableFrom checks. However, if you build it well, at least you can abstract it out some, handle it generically, and not have to worry about adding additional checks if you add additional vehicle types.

I could go on to explain strategy patterns, but it's done better here: http://www.javacodegeeks.com/2012/04/strategy-pattern.html (with spring)

Many frameworks will have classes out-of-the-box to facilitate this.

share|improve this answer

This is a classic case for the Double Dispatch design pattern.

You need to add a tiny bit of call-back code in the vehicle, which will be dynamically bound to the appropriate method of the validator at runtime:

public interface Vehicle {
    void validate(Validator validator);
}

public class Car implements Vehicle {
    public void validate(Validator validator) {
        validator.validateCar(this);
    }
}

public class MotorBike implements Vehicle {
    public void validate(Validator validator) {
        validator.validateMotorBike(this);
    }
}

public class Validator {
    public void validateCar(Car car) {
       // validate a car
    }

    public void validateMotorBike(MotorBike motorBike) {
        // validate a motorbike
    }
}

public void process(Vehicle vehicle) {
    Validator validator = new Validator();
    vehicle.validate(validator);
    doSomething(vehicle);
}
share|improve this answer
    
But from the code in the question, the validation is vehicle sub type specific. –  Taylor Jan 25 '13 at 16:09
    
@Taylor OMG. That's what this code does! I've edited the code and changed the method names and added comments to help clarify –  Bohemian Jan 25 '13 at 20:25
    
I must have missed something, I see it now. My derp. –  Taylor Jan 25 '13 at 20:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.