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I have 2 methods in java (for example Factorial calculation) and i have to test these 2 methods to find which one is faster. I have that code as Recursion and as for loop:

They both in the same Class data.

    public long FakultaetRekursiv( int n){
        if(n == 1){
        return 1;
        }
        else{
        return FakultaetRekursiv(n-1) * n;
        }
    }


    public long Fakultaet( int n){
        int x=1;
        for(int i=1; i<=n; i++){
            x= x*i;
        }
        return x;       
    }

I heard currentTimeMillis() could help a little but i dont know how to do exactly. Thanks.

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1  
You should implement it by looking up the result in an array where all possible values are stored. That is quite sure the fastest implementation of Fakultaet. –  MrSmith42 Jan 24 '13 at 20:10
1  
Neither of these methods will run long enough to be optimised or to matter. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 24 '13 at 20:11
1  
You should change your recursive implementation to check n==0 instead of n==1 because 0! == 1 by definition. And maybe throw an Exception for negative n values. –  MrSmith42 Jan 24 '13 at 20:12

4 Answers 4

Micro-benchmarking is hard, use the right tools, for example Caliper. Here is an example that will work for you:

import com.google.caliper.SimpleBenchmark;

public class Benchmark extends SimpleBenchmark {

    @Param({"1", "10", "100"}) private int arg;

    public void timeFakultaet(int reps) {
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; ++i) {
            Fakultaet(arg);
        }
    }

    public void timeFakultaetRekursiv(int reps) {
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; ++i) {
            FakultaetRekursiv(arg);
        }
    }

}

The framework will run tour time*() methods a lot of times, moreover it will inject different arg values and bechmark them separately.

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1  
Make sure you do not ignore the result of the test-method. Once I had the case that my whole method seamed to be removed while optimization because the result was never used in the test loop. –  MrSmith42 Jan 24 '13 at 20:09
    
@MrSmith42: +1. This problem is described in caliper documentation and caliper even tries to discover it. I wanted to keep the example short. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 24 '13 at 20:13
    
thank you so much for your comments guys. i learned a lot from you. But there is little thing that i supposed to use currentTimeMillis() to compare loop or recursive way works faster. Any ideas ? –  altank52 Jan 24 '13 at 20:33

Always go by the basics ! Just use this to find the time taken by each of the functions

long startTime = System.nanoTime();
methodToTime();
long endTime = System.nanoTime();

long duration = endTime - startTime;
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if i try to modify that with my code, i get a "unreachable statement" compiler mistake. how can i modify ? –  altank52 Jan 24 '13 at 20:11
long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

// your code here

System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start + "ms");
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well, when i want modify my codes with your solution. i reach a compile mistake(unreachable statement). so i made another class public long getLastRuntime(){ long start = System.currentTimeMillis(); return start; } and i changed my new code so public long FakultaetRekursiv( int n){ if(n == 1){ return 1; } else{ return FakultaetRekursiv(n-1) * n; } System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - getLastRuntime() + "ms"); } –  altank52 Jan 24 '13 at 20:06
    
@altank52 maybe you are paste after return statement. Pls, show your code –  isvforall Jan 24 '13 at 20:13
    
@altank52 paste System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - getLastRuntime() + "ms"); before return –  isvforall Jan 24 '13 at 20:18
    
In here it wont look nicely but sure :public class Rekursion{ public long getLastRuntime(){ long start = System.currentTimeMillis(); return start; } public long Fakultaet( int n){ int x=1; for(int i=1; i<=n; i++){ x= x*i; } return x; } public long FakultaetRekursiv( int n){ if(n == 1){ return 1; } else{ return FakultaetRekursiv(n-1) * n; } System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - getLastRuntime() + "ms"); } } –  altank52 Jan 24 '13 at 20:18
    
when i paste that before the return statement, i get 0 ms back for whole loop :( –  altank52 Jan 24 '13 at 20:24

You can also do it by hand:

The first method can be described with a recurrence relation of F(x) = F(x-1) * x which generates the pattern...

F(x) = F(x-1) * x
= F(x-2)*x*(x-1)
= F(x-3)*x*(x-1)*(x-2)
. . .
= k*n

which is O(n).

Obviously, the second method can be described by O(n) as well, which means they are in the same upper bound. But this can be used as a quick check before implementing timing solutions.

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@MrSmith42 EDIT: You're right! - and I did mess up my big O notation. –  sdasdadas Jan 24 '13 at 20:20

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