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i want to access the arr variable from inside the inner class method MyMethod. When i try to print it from there i end up getting a null pointer exception.

public class MyClass{
    String[] arr;
    MyClass my;

    public MyClass(){
      my = new MyClass();
    }

     public class MyInner {
        public void MyMethod() {
            // I need to access 'my.arr' from here how can i do it. 
         }

       }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
       String[] n={"ddd","f"};

       my.arr=n;
     }
}
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You are creating an infinite initializing loop in the constructor. What do you basically want to do? –  shuangwhywhy Jan 24 '13 at 20:09
    
Move the = new MyClass() out: MyClass my = new MyClass(). and may be static -- because you want to access it in main method. But after all, what do you want to do from the beginning? –  shuangwhywhy Jan 24 '13 at 20:16
    
i want to access arr which is declared in the outterclass from the innerclass method MyMethod(). arr will be initialize in the main() method. –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:19
    
I mean, do you really want my in MyClass? Or you want it initialized in main method? It seems you are accessing my.arr in main, so you just remove MyClass my; and my = new MyClass(); and you can access arr (not my.arr, just arr) in myMethod(). And add MyClass my = new MyClass(); my.arr = n; in main(). –  shuangwhywhy Jan 24 '13 at 20:26
    
I think you should look at the concept of Constructor BTW: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/constructors.html –  shuangwhywhy Jan 24 '13 at 20:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You haven't initialized it yet, so the reference is null. Initialize it in your constructor for example, and you will have access to the variable via your inner class.

public class MyClass {
    String[] arr;

    public MyClass (String[] a_arr) {
        arr = a_arr;
    }

    public class MyInner {
        public void MyMethod () {
            // I need to access 'my.arr' from here how can i do it. 
        }

    }

    public static void main (String[] args) {
        String[] n= {"ddd","f"};
        MyClass myClass = new MyClass (n);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How do i initialize it at the constructor ? –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:05
    
@sharonHwk I have edited my answer with an example based on the code you have provided. I've also corrected the problem noted by Peter Lawrey. His answer is also really good BTW. –  Laf Jan 24 '13 at 20:19
    
You are correct but, i have to initialize arr in the main() method it self. how should i edit the code to do so ? –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:20
    
@sharonHwk You can pass it as a parameter to your constructor. I've updated the code example. –  Laf Jan 24 '13 at 20:23

You can use just arr. However until you set it to something it will be null

BTW: Your my = new MyClass() will blow up as it will create objects until it stack overflows.

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How can i use arr inside the main() method as it's static –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:09
    
You have to create an instance of MyClass. This means fixing the constructor so it doesn't blow up. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 24 '13 at 20:12
    
Ok done. but then how am i going to access arr from MyMethod(). How and where should i initialize the arr. sorry but i am a beginner –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:14
    
The hardest thing to remember is to write code which as simply as possible solves a problem. You don't appear to be solving a problem which leads me to suggest you not do any of it. However if it is just an exercise you need to create an instance of the nested class and you can initialise arr when it declared. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 24 '13 at 20:21

Well, for starters in your main method you never create an instance of your class.

Also, MyClass has a reference to a MyClass object. In the constructor of MyClass, it initializes that reference by calling it's own constructor. That's an endless loop.

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How do i initialize it at the constructor ? –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:05
    
If i remove the MyClass reference from the constructor then how am i going to access the array from the main method ? –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:07
    
In the main method: MyClass object = new MyClass(); object.arr; –  Aurand Jan 24 '13 at 21:07

Do the following. Your way of initialization is wrong.

public class MyClass{
    String[] arr;
    MyClass my;

    public MyClass(){
    }

     public class MyInner {
        public void MyMethod() {
            // I need to access 'my.arr' from here how can i do it. 
         }

       }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
       String[] n={"ddd","f"};
       MyClass my=new MyClass();
String[] b = new String[2];

System.arraycopy( n, 0, b, 0, n.length );
     }
}

In case of more than 2 strings, simply do String[] b = new String[n.length];

share|improve this answer
    
I can't have it as new String[2];, i might even have more than 2 –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:08
    
check my edit... –  Aakash Anuj Jan 24 '13 at 20:08
    
accept if it helps –  Aakash Anuj Jan 24 '13 at 20:09
    
can u explain System.arraycopy( n, 0, b, 0, n.length ); and will now be able to access arr from MyMethod() ? –  sharon Hwk Jan 24 '13 at 20:11
    
System.arraycopy just copies an array into another . So it copies n to b with the size of n. –  Aakash Anuj Jan 24 '13 at 20:13

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