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Lets say I've got the following predicates:

father(aaron, chloe).
father(aaron, dan).
father(aaron, emily).
father(frank, george).
mother(beth, chloe).
mother(beth, dan).
mother(beth, emily).
mother(emily, george).
sibling(X,Y) :-...
parents(X,Y) :-...

I want to find the shortest route (distance) between two members of the family tree. The distance between parents for instance is 2, and between brothers (siblings) is one. I've tried the following (but it didn't work):

 parent(X,Y) :- 
    father(X,Y);  
    mother(X,Y). 

sibling(X,Y):- 
    parent(Z,X), !, parent(Z,Y),
    not(X=Y).

not_in_list(_,[]).
not_in_list(X,[Y|L]):- 
    not(X=Y), 
    not_in_list(X,L).

edge(X,Y):- 
    (parent(X,Y);
    parent(Y,X);
    sibling(X,Y)).

list_length(0,[]).
list_length(N,[_|Ys]):- 
    list_length(N1,Ys), 
    N is N1+1.

travel_graph(X,X,_).
travel_graph(From,To,[From|Path]):- 
    edge(From,Next), 
    not_in_list(Next,Path), 
    travel_graph(Next,To,Path).

degree(X,Y,N):- 
    travel_graph(X,Y,L), 
    list_length(N,L).
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The ! hurts! Use dif(X,Y). –  false Jan 30 '13 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

In general when you want shortest paths you want a breadth-first search. There's some discussion here: Breadth-First in Prolog

Prolog is going to try to find solutions depth first, so it's going to see just how far a particular line of reasoning can take it. When you want the shortest path, you would rather Prolog try all the first options, then iterate outward one from each of those, until you find a solution. This way, the first solution you find will be the shortest. It's the only way to go if you might have infinite solutions (such as walking a maze where you can back up and retrace your steps).

Unfortunately there's no magic switch you can flip to get breadth-first search, so you'll have to implement it. O'Keefe explains this very lucidly in The Craft of Prolog, by explaining first how to convert a normal Prolog search into an explicit depth-first search with an "open set" of things yet-to-be-tried, and then how to change the order of the list representing the open set to get breadth-first behavior instead.

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Are you aware of iterative deepening? It combines the advantage of depth-first (minimal memory consumption) with breadth first. –  false Jan 30 '13 at 19:02

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