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I apologize for so many questions, but I felt that they make the most sense only when treated as a unit

Note - all quotes are from DDD: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software ( pages 250 and 251 )

1)

Operations can be broadly divided into two categories, commands and queries.

...

Operations that return results without producing side effects are called functions. A function can be called multiple times and return the same value each time.

...

Obviously, you can't avoid commands in most software systems, but the problem can be mitigated in two ways. First, you can keep the commands and queries strictly segregated in different operations. Ensure that the methods that cause changes do not return domain data and are kept as simple as possible. Perform all queries and calculations in methods that cause no observable side effects

a) Author implies that a query is a function since it doesn't produce side effects. He also notes that function will always return same value, by which I assume he means that for the same input we will always get the same output?

b) Assume we have a method QandC(int entityId) which queries for specific domain entity, from which it extracts certain values, which in turn are used to initialize a new Value Object and this VO is then returned to the caller. Isn't according to above quote QandC a function, since it doesn't change any state?

c) But author also argues that for same input a function will always produce same output, which isn't the case with QandC, since if we place several calls to QandC, it will produce different results, assuming that in the time between the two calls this entity was modified or even deleted. As such, how can we claim QandC is a function?

d)

Ensure that the methods that cause changes do not return domain data ...

Reason being that the state of returned non-VO may be changed in some future operations and as such the side effects of such methods are unpredictable?

e)

Ensure that the methods that cause changes do not return domain data ...

Is a query method that returns an entity still considered a function, even if it doesn't change any state?

2)

VALUE OBJECTS are immutable, which implies that, apart from initializers called only during creation, all their operations are functions.

...

An operation that mixes logic or calculations with state change should be refactored into two separate operations. But by definition, this segregation of side effects into simple command methods only applies to ENTITIES. After completing the refactoring to separate modification from querying, consider a second refactoring to move the responsibility for the complex calculations into a VALUE OBJECT. The side effect often can be completely eliminated by deriving a VALUE OBJECT instead of changing existing state, or by moving the entire responsibility into a VALUE OBJECT.

a)

VALUE OBJECTS are immutable, which implies that, apart from initializers called only during creation, all their operations are functions ... But by definition, this segregation of side effects into simple command methods only applies to ENTITIES.

I think author is saying all methods defined on VOs are functions, which doesn't make sense, since even though a method defined on a VO can't change its own state, it still can change the state of other, non-VO objects?!

b) Assuming method defined on an entity doesn't change any state, do we consider such a method as being a function, even though it is defined on an entity?

c)

... consider a second refactoring to move the responsibility for the complex calculations into a VALUE OBJECT.

Why is author suggesting we should only refactor from entities those function that perform complex calculations? Why instead shouldn't we also refactor simpler functions?

d)

... consider a second refactoring to move the responsibility for the complex calculations into a VALUE OBJECT.

In any case, why is author suggesting we should refactor functions out of entities and place them inside VOs? Just because it makes it more apparent to the client that this operation MAY be a function?

e)

The side effect often can be completely eliminated by deriving a VALUE OBJECT instead of changing existing state, or by moving the entire responsibility into a VALUE OBJECT.

This doesn't make sense, since it appears author is arguing if we move a command ( ie operation which changes the state ) into a VO, then we will in essence eliminate any side-effects, even if command is changing the state. So any ideas, what was author actually trying to say?

UPDATE:

1b)

It depends on the perspective. A database query does not change state and thus has no side effects, however it isn't deterministic by nature, since as you point out the data can change. In the book, the author is referring to functions associated with value object and entities, which don't themselves make external calls. Therefore, the rules don't apply to QandC.

So author was describing only functions that don't make external calls and as such QandC isn't a type of function that author was describing?

1c)

QandC does not itself change state - there are no side effects. The underlying state may be changed out of band however. Due to this, it is not a pure function.

But it also isn't the Side-Effect-Free function in the sense author defined them?

1d)

Again, this is based on CQS.

I know I'm repeating myself, but I assume discussion in the book is based on CQS and CQS doesn't consider QandC as Side Effect Free function due to a chance of entity returned by QandC having its state modified ( by some other operation ) sometime in the future?

1e)

It is considered a query from the CQRS perspective, but it cannot be called a function in the sense that a pure function on a VO is a function due to lack of determinism.

  • I don't quite understand what you were trying to say ( the confusing part is in bold ). Perhaps that while QandC is considered a query, it is not considered a function due to returning an entity and such the side-effects are unpredictable, which makes QandC a non-deterministic by nature

  • So author is only making those statements ( see quote in 1e ) under the implicit assumption that no operation defined in VO will ever try to change the state of non-VO objects?

2d)

Given that VOs are immutable, they are a fitting place to house pure functions. This is another step towards freeing domain knowledge from technical constraints.

  • I don't understand why moving function from entity to VO would help free domain knowledge from technical constraints ( I'm also not really sure what you mean by technical – technical as in technology-related or... )?

  • I assume other reason for putting function in VO is because it is that much more obvious ( to client ) that this is a function?

2e)

I view this as a hint towards event-sourcing. Instead of changing existing state, you add a new event which represents the change. There is still a net side effect, however existing state remains stable.

I must confess I know nothing about even-source programming, since I'd like to first wrap my head around DDD. Anyway, so author didn't imply that just moving a command to VO would automatically eliminate side-effects, but instead some additional actions would have to be taken ( such as implementing event-sourcing ), only he "forgot" to mention that part?

SECOND UPDATE:

2d)

One of the defining characteristics of an entity is its identity .... By placing business logic into VOs you can consider it outside of the context of an entity's identity. This makes it easier to test this logic, among other things.

I somehwat understand the point you're making ( when thinking about the concept from distance ), but on the other hand I really don't. Why would function within an entity be influenced by an identity of this entity ( assuming this function is pure function, in other word it doesn't change state and is deterministic )?

2e)

Yes that is my understanding of it - there is still a net "side effect". However, there are different ways to attain a side effect. One way is to mutate existing state. Another way is to make the state change explicit with an object representing that change.

I - Just to be sure ... From your answer I gather that author didn't imply that side-effects would be eliminated simply by moving a command into VO?

II - Ok,if I understand you correctly, we can move a command into VOs ( even though VOs shouldn't change the state of anything and as such shouldn't cause any side-effects ) and this command inside VO is still allowed to produce some sort of side effects, but this side effect is somehow more acceptable ( OR MORE CONTROLLABLE ) by making state change explicit ( which I interpret as the thing that changed is returned to the caller as VO )?

3) I must say that I still don't quite understand why state-changing method SC shouldn't return domain objects. Perhaps because non-VO may be changed in some future operations and as such the side effects of SC are very unpredictable?

THIRD UPDATE:

Delegating the management of state to the entity and the implementation of behavior to VOs creates certain advantages. One is basic partitioning of responsibilities.

a) You're saying that even though a method describes a behavior of an entity ( and thus entity containing this method adheres to SRP ) and as such belongs in the entity, it may still be a good idea to move it into VO? Thus in essence, we would partition a responsibility of an entity into two even smaller responsibilities?

b) But won't moving behavior into VO basically turn this entity into a mere data container ( I understand that entity will still manage its state, but still ... )?

thank you

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1a) Yes. The discourse on separating queries from commands is based on the Command-query separation principle.

1b) It depends on the perspective. A database query does not change state and thus has no side effects, however it isn't deterministic by nature, since as you point out the data can change. In the book, the author is referring to functions associated with value object and entities, which don't themselves make external calls. Therefore, the rules don't apply to QandC. Determinism could be fabricated however, offering degrees of "pureness". For instance, a serializable transaction could be created which can ensure that data doesn't change for its duration.

1c) QandC does not itself change state - there are no side effects. The underlying state may be changed out of band however. Due to this, it is not a pure function. However, the restriction that QandC doesn't change state is still valuable. The value is fittingly demonstrated by CQRS which is the application of CQS in distributed scenarios.

1d) Again, this is based on CQS. Another take on this is the Tell-Don't-Ask principle. Given an understanding of these principles however, the rule can be bent IMO. A side-effecting method could return a VO representing the result for instance. However, in certain scenarios such as CQRS + Event Sourcing it could be desirable for commands to return void.

1e) It is considered a query from the CQRS perspective, but it cannot be called a function in the sense that a pure function on a VO is a function due to lack of determinism.

2a) No, a VO function shouldn't change state of anything, it should instead return a new object.

2b) Yes.

2c) Because functional purity tends to become more important in more complex scenarios. However, as you point out, isn't a clear and definitive rule. It shouldn't be based on complexity as much as it is based on the domain at hand.

2d) Given that VOs are immutable, they are a fitting place to house pure functions. This is another step towards freeing domain knowledge from technical constraints.

2e) I view this as a hint towards event-sourcing. Instead of changing existing state, you add a new event which represents the change. There is still a net side effect, however existing state remains stable.

UPDATE

1b) Yes.

1c) It is a side-effect free function, however it is not a deterministic function because it cannot be thought to always return the same value given the same input. For example, the function that returns the current time is a side-effect free function, but it certainly does not return the same value in subsequent calls.

1d) QandC can be thought of as side-effect free, but not pure. Another way to look at functional purity is as referential transparency - the ability to replace a function call by its value without changing program behavior. In other words, asking the question does not change the answer. QandC can guarantee that, but only within a context such as a transaction. So QandC can be thought of as a function, but only in a specific context.

1e) I think the confusing part is that the author is talking specifically about functions on VOs and entities - not database queries, where as we are talking about both. My statement extends the discussion to database queries and CQRS given certain restrictions, ie an ambient transaction.

2d) I can see how what I said was a bit vague, I was getting lazy. One of the defining characteristics of an entity is its identity. It maintains its identity throughout its life-cycle while its state may change. By placing business logic into VOs you can consider it outside of the context of an entity's identity. This makes it easier to test this logic, among other things.

2e) Yes that is my understanding of it - there is still a net "side effect". However, there are different ways to attain a side effect. One way is to mutate existing state. Another way is to make the state change explicit with an object representing that change.

UPDATE 2

2d) This particular point can be argued or can be a matter of preference. One perspective is the idea is based on the single-responsibility principle (SRP). The responsibility of an entity is the association of an identity with behavior and state. Behavior combines input with existing state to produce state transitions. Delegating the management of state to the entity and the implementation of behavior to VOs creates certain advantages. One is basic partitioning of responsibilities. Another is more subtle and perhaps more arguable. It is the idea that logic can be considered in a stateless manner. This allows thinking about such logic easier and more like thinking about a mathematical equation where all changes are explicit - no hidden state.

2e.1) Yes, eliminating a net side effect would alter behavior, which is not the goal.

2e.2) Yes.

3) Commands returning void have several advantages. One is that they become naturally more adept in async scenarios - no need to wait for a result. Another is that it allows you to represent the operation as a single command object - again, because there is no return value. This applies in CQRS and also event sourcing. In these cases, any command output is dispatched as an event instead of a result. But again, if these requirements don't apply returning a result object can be appropriate.

UPDATE 3

a) Yes, and this is a specific type of partitioning.

b) The responsibility of the entity is to coordinate behavior by delegating to VOs and applying the resulting state changes.

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Can you see my update? –  user437291 Jan 24 '13 at 22:48
    
Can you see my second update? –  user437291 Jan 25 '13 at 21:11
    
Can you see my final update? –  user437291 Jan 26 '13 at 14:09
    
thank you for your help, I really appreciate it –  user437291 Jan 28 '13 at 18:39

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