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I have an if/else condition, and the if and else sections are identical, save for the operator used. In one case <, and in the other >. Is there a way to conditionally set that operator, to DRY out the code?

if count_year < end_year
    while count_year <= end_year
        if count_year % 4 == 0
            if count_year % 100 != 0
                all_years << count_year unless (count_year % 400 == 0)
            end
        end
        count_year += 1
    end
    puts all_years
elsif count_year > end_year
    while count_year >= end_year
        if count_year % 4 == 0
            if count_year % 100 != 0
                all_years << count_year unless (count_year % 400 == 0)
            end
        end
        count_year -= 1
    end
    puts all_years.reverse
end

This is part of a program for printing out leap years between two given years. I feel like there must be a way to not have to repeat the loop twice. Something like: count_year < end_year ? operator = "<" : operator = ">" - Then using that variable to substitute the operator into a code block or something? Any ideas?

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Well, your if/else blocks are not identical: diffchecker.com/95tE8044 –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 24 '13 at 20:52
1  
Thanks @sawa. It was not really obvious :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 24 '13 at 21:05
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For one small improvement, you can extract really identical parts into a method. Then duplication stops being so massive.

# I'm too lazy to come up with a proper name for it.
def foo count_year, all_years
  if count_year % 4 == 0
    if count_year % 100 != 0
      all_years << count_year unless (count_year % 400 == 0)
    end
  end
end


# later...

if count_year < end_year
  while count_year <= end_year
    foo count_year, all_years
    count_year += 1
  end
  puts all_years
elsif count_year > end_year
  while count_year >= end_year
    foo count_year, all_years
    count_year -= 1
  end
  puts all_years.reverse
end

But, the operator substitution...

Yes, there is a way to dynamically choose an operator for evaluation. You see, operators in ruby are just method calls, nothing more. These two lines are equivalent:

7 > 5
7.>(5)

And here's a snippet that chooses random operator for comparison. I leave it up to you to adapt it for your problem (if you want, that is. I advise you against this).

def is_7_greater_than_5
  operator = [:<, :>].sample # pick random operator
  7.send(operator, 5)
end

is_7_greater_than_5 # => false
is_7_greater_than_5 # => false
is_7_greater_than_5 # => true
is_7_greater_than_5 # => true
is_7_greater_than_5 # => true
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Okay I see where you're coming from. Answer is a bit scrappy, but that's because my approach is a bit scrappy. I'm accepting this one because it's more relevant, even though I'll probably use DigitalRoss's approach. :) –  Glynne McReynolds Jan 24 '13 at 21:16
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def example count_year, end_year
  all_years = []

  dir, test = count_year < end_year                      ?
    [ 1, proc { |c, e| c <= e }] : count_year > end_year ?
    [-1, proc { |c, e| c >  e }] :
    [ 0, proc { |c, e| false  }]

  while test.call count_year, end_year
    if count_year % 4 == 0
      if count_year % 100 != 0
        all_years << count_year unless count_year % 400 == 0
      end
    end
    count_year += dir
    puts dir > 0 ? all_years : all_years.reverse
  end
end
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I love it. Proc is still a little confusing to me so I never thought of using it, but this is super succinct and I'll be going out of my way to study up on Proc more to do things like this. –  Glynne McReynolds Jan 24 '13 at 21:18
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Aww. Why did you do a code golf exercise and accept an answer so quickly? Boo! :( hehe. just kidding. The early bird gets the worm. I perhaps took the problem too literally as I think you're just looking to experiment with compare.

I would use the built in functions of ruby and decomposed this method into a class. :)

require 'date'

class LeapYearFinder

  attr_reader :years, :years_reversed

  def initialize(start_year, end_year)
    @start_year    = Date.parse("1/1/#{start_year.to_s}")
    @end_year      = Date.parse("1/1/#{end_year.to_s}")
    @years         ||= leap_years
  end

  def compare_range
    @compare_range ||= Range.new(@start_year, @end_year)
  end

  def leap_years
    years = []
    compare_range.step {|x| years << x.year if x.leap? }
    years.uniq!
  end

  def years_reversed
    @years.reverse
  end

end

lp = LeapYearFinder.new(1900, 2012)

puts "Years putzed"
lp.years.map {|x| puts x}

puts "Years reversed"
lp.years_reversed.map {|x| puts x}

Some corner case issues

  • handle a reverse date input
  • step properly through the range thus avoiding the uniq! and maybe yielding better performance
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