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Firstly I am pretty new to C#. I would like to have an interface declare a member function like in the following piece of code

interface IMyInterface {
    void MyAction() {
        // do stuff depending on the output of function()
    }
    void Function();
}

here Function is pure virtual and should be implemented by children of IMyInterface. I could use an abstract class instead of an interface but then I could not inherit from other classes... Say for example that MyAction is recursiverly searching a directory for files and applying Function to any file found to make my example clear.

How to change my design in order to overcome the constraint that interfaces cannot implement classes ?

Edit : In C++ what I would do is using templates as such

template<class A>
static void MyAction(const A& a) {
    // do stuff depending on the output of A::Function()
};

class MyClass {
    void Function();
};

I was wondering if there were an elegant way to do this using interfaces in C#.

share|improve this question
9  
Full stop: interfaces can never define implementation. –  Kirk Woll Jan 24 '13 at 21:25
1  
Interfaces cannot contain code. They simply define the members that an implementing class must provide. –  Matt Jan 24 '13 at 21:25
    
Could you please clarify exactly what you are looking to do? –  Philip Tenn Jan 24 '13 at 21:25
    
I edited my question. Sorry for not being clear in the first place. –  vanna Jan 24 '13 at 21:28
    
Not to mention that "the output of function()" is void, which is pretty hard to "do stuff depending on". –  Edmund Schweppe Jan 24 '13 at 21:33

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In C# you don't have multiple inheritance. You can circumvent this limitation by using composition.

Define your interface like this (Function needs not to be defined here):

public interface IMyInterface
{
    void MyAction();
}

Declare an abstract class with an abstract Function and implementing this interface:

public abstract class MyInterfaceBase : IMyInterface
{
    public void MyAction()
    {
        Function();
    }

    protected abstract void Function();
}

From this abstract class you can derive a concrete implementation. This is not yet your "final" class, but it will be used to compose it.

public class ConcreteMyInterface : MyInterfaceBase
{
    protected override void Function()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("hello");
    }
}

Now let's come to your "final", composed class. It will derive from SomeBaseClass and implement IMyInterface by integrating the functionality of ConcreteMyInterface:

public class SomeBaseClass
{
}

public class MyComposedClass : SomeBaseClass, IMyInterface
{
    private IMyInterface _myInterface = new ConcreteMyInterface();

    public void MyAction()
    {
        _myInterface.MyAction();
    }
}

UPDATE

In C# you can declare local classes. This comes even closer to multiple inheritance, as you can derive everything within you composing class.

public class MyComposedClass : SomeBaseClass, IMyInterface
{
    private IMyInterface _myInterface = new ConcreteMyInterface();

    public void MyAction()
    {
        _myInterface.MyAction();
    }

    private class ConcreteMyInterface : MyInterfaceBase
    {
        protected override void Function()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("hello");
        }
    }
}
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The only way to directly handle this would be to use an abstract class, as the interface cannot contain "logic" of any form, and is merely a contract.

One alternative, however, would be to make an interface and a static class. You could then place your logic in an extension method using the interface.

public interface IMyInterface {
    void Function();
}

public static class MyInterfaceExtensions {
    public static void MyAction(this IMyInterface object)
    {
       // use object.Function() as needed
    }
}

The main disadvantages here are more types, which reduces maintainability, and a lack of discoverability.

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2  
+1 for mentioning the often overlooked alternative of using extension methods for implementing functionality in interfaces. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 24 '13 at 21:29
3  
@dasblinkenlight And yet I worry that a brand new C# user may not understand the distinction between an extension method and a true instance method. It can cause problems if you don't understand how they're different. –  Servy Jan 24 '13 at 21:30
    
@Servy - I agree - I don't think extension methods should be a first choice design approach. Best left for cases where you need to extend the behaviour on classes you can't modify directly. –  RJ Lohan Jan 24 '13 at 21:38
    
I agree completely - which is why I specifically mentioned that there are disadvantages to this approach. Given the OP's requirements (using an interface, but providing logic), this may be a reasonable approach, however. –  Reed Copsey Jan 24 '13 at 21:51

You can define MyAction as extension method:

public interface IMyInterface
{
   void Function();
}

public static class MyInterfaceExtensions
{
    public static void MyAction(this IMyInterface obj)
    {
        obj.Function();
    }
}

Example:

public class HelloWorld : IMyInterface
{
    public void Function()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        new HelloWorld().MyAction();
    }
} 

Output:

Hello World
share|improve this answer
1  
A confusing area, and not a design approach I'd suggest to a self-confessed beginner. Extension methods are better used to provide extra functionality on classes over which you have no control, not as a general design method. –  RJ Lohan Jan 24 '13 at 21:37
    
@RJLohan: Actually almost everything related to LINQ is designed this way. There is a minimal interface implemented by classes (IEnumerable<T>) and a static class with several dozen extension methods (Enumerable). Of course, this design has limitations that should be understood before it's applied, and I agree that it's probably not the best choice for a beginner. –  dtb Jan 24 '13 at 21:41
    
that example supports my point - LINQ is designed to provide behaviour on classes which the developers (in this case; Microsoft) have no control over (in this case; everything ever written by anyone which implements IEnumerable). –  RJ Lohan Jan 24 '13 at 21:46

Interfaces can't implement any behavior they are just contracts. If you want to implement some logic while defining a contract you could use an abstract class.

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1  
I know. That is the point of my question, how to overcome this knowing my needs. –  vanna Jan 24 '13 at 21:26
2  
@vanna Actually, you never asked a question. You only made a number of statements. The implied question is, "how can I define the implementation of a method in an interface?" and the (correct) answer is, you can't. If you have a problem that you want solved, and want to know how to solve it, then describe that problem, don't ask how to define a method in an interface. –  Servy Jan 24 '13 at 21:27

Declare the function's interface (Signature and return types), in an interface, Then create an abstract class that is defined to implement that interface, and implement a basic default implementation in the abstract class. Then, create other concrete classes that inherit from the abstract class, but when necessary, override the abstract classes base implementation with different implementation.

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This sort of problem might best be overcome by separating the external behaviours; MyAction in this case, from the internal implementation; MyFunction.

The point here is understanding what should be part of the interface/contract between this class and others, and what should be part of the implementation of that contract.

Here, the contract between this object and its consumers is defined;

interface IMyInterface
{
    void MyAction();
}

Now, a base class which implements this interface, and also enforces a particular behaviour;

abstract class BaseClass : IMyInterface
{
    public void MyAction()
    {
        // do some commmon action

        // call derived implementation to deal with the outcome
    }

    protected abstract MyFunvoid ction();
}

And finally, a concrete implementation which deals with the results of MyFunction in some specific way;

class ConcreteClass : BaseClass
{
    protected override void MyFunction()
    {
         // concrete iomplementation here
    }
}
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For that purpose . you need to define abstract class. You can provide default implementations or you can leave the implementation to the derived class.

If the derived class want to override some thing they can always do that . This gives them the flexibility to use base along with changes they want to override.

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An interface is a contract, and cannot contain implementation.

From your statement above:

I could use an abstract class instead of an interface but then I could not inherit from other classes

I believe you are hitting the "why does C# not support multiple inheritance" question.

Here is a CodeProject Article on Simulated Multiple Inheritance for C#. You should be able to follow this pattern to achieve a workaround to the simple inheritance model of C#.

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2  
This is more of an observation of @vanna's situation than it is an answer... –  Austin Salonen Jan 24 '13 at 21:32
    
@AustinSalonen Good point, thanks. I edited my answer based on your comment. –  Philip Tenn Jan 24 '13 at 21:43

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