Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to write a bash script that checks if there is at least one parameter and if there is one, if that parameter is either a 0 or a 1. this is the script:

#/bin/bash
if (("$#" < 1)) && ( (("$0" != 1)) ||  (("$0" -ne 0q)) ) ; then
echo this script requires a 1 or 0 as first parameter.
fi
xinput set-prop 12 "Device Enabled" $0

This gives the following errors:

./setTouchpadEnabled: line 2: ((: ./setTouchpadEnabled != 1: syntax error: operand expected (error token is "./setTouchpadEnabled != 1")
./setTouchpadEnabled: line 2: ((: ./setTouchpadEnabled -ne 0q: syntax error: operand expected (error token is "./setTouchpadEnabled -ne 0q")

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
It looks like you are running your script using sh ./setTouchpadEnabled instead of using bash. – jordanm Jan 25 '13 at 5:35
up vote 21 down vote accepted

This script works!

#/bin/bash
if [[ ( "$#" < 1 ) || ( !( "$1" == 1 ) && !( "$1" == 0 ) ) ]] ; then
    echo this script requires a 1 or 0 as first parameter.
else
    echo "first parameter is $1"
    xinput set-prop 12 "Device Enabled" $0
fi

But this also works, and in addition keeps the logic of the OP, since the question is about calculations. Here it is with only arithmetic expressions:

#/bin/bash
if (( $# )) && (( $1 == 0 || $1 == 1 )); then
    echo "first parameter is $1"
    xinput set-prop 12 "Device Enabled" $0
else
    echo this script requiers a 1 or 0 as first parameter.
fi

The output is the same1:

$ ./tmp.sh 
this script requires a 1 or 0 as first parameter.

$ ./tmp.sh 0
first parameter is 0

$ ./tmp.sh 1
first parameter is 1

$ ./tmp.sh 2
this script requires a 1 or 0 as first parameter.

[1] the second fails if the first argument is a string

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, the error is because the command is xinput and not input – Cheiron Jan 24 '13 at 22:27
    
Any particular reason you didn't stick with the arithmetic expressions also used in the question? I.e. use of (( and )). – 0xC0000022L Jan 24 '13 at 22:29
1  
@user828193: well clearly this is about calculations, so arithmetic expressions are the way to go. Which is why I found it irritating that you changed this aspect of the question in your answer. – 0xC0000022L Jan 25 '13 at 0:25
    
@0xC0000022L: You are right! Here it is with arithmetic expressions. I guess I got carried off by the -ne and the comparison to a possibly empty string in the OP's code... – user000001 Jan 25 '13 at 1:55

Easier solution;

#/bin/bash
if (( ${1:-2} >= 2 )); then
    echo "First parameter must be 0 or 1"
fi
# rest of script...

Output

$ ./test 
First parameter must be 0 or 1
$ ./test 0
$ ./test 1
$ ./test 4
First parameter must be 0 or 1
$ ./test 2
First parameter must be 0 or 1

Explanation

  • (( )) - Evaluates the expression using integers.
  • ${1:-2} - Uses parameter expansion to set a value of 2 if undefined.
  • >= 2 - True if the integer is greater than or equal to two 2.
share|improve this answer

The zeroth parameter of a shell command is the command itself (or sometimes the shell itself). You should be using $1.

(("$#" < 1)) && ( (("$1" != 1)) ||  (("$1" -ne 0q)) )

Your boolean logic is also a bit confused:

(( "$#" < 1 && # If the number of arguments is less than one…
  "$1" != 1 || "$1" -ne 0)) # …how can the first argument possibly be 1 or 0?

This is probably what you want:

(( "$#" )) && (( $1 == 1 || $1 == 0 )) # If true, there is at least one argument and its value is 0 or 1
share|improve this answer
    
This is an improvement, thank you. It however still gives me errors: ./setTouchpadEnabled: line 2: ((: != 1: syntax error: operand expected (error token is "!= 1") ./setTouchpadEnabled: line 2: ((: != 0: syntax error: operand expected (error token is "!= 0") – Cheiron Jan 24 '13 at 21:44
1  
The quotes aren't strictly necessary inside (( )), but they make StackOverflow's highlighting smarter. – kojiro Jan 24 '13 at 21:46
    
Removing the quotes gives the same error, unfortunately – Cheiron Jan 24 '13 at 21:48
    
@Cheiron I think you misunderstood my comment. Take another look at my answer. – kojiro Jan 24 '13 at 21:49
1  
Oh wow, I was indeed doing boolean logic wrong. It still gives me errors, though: ./setTouchpadEnabled: line 2: ((: 0 && ( == 1 || == 0 ) : syntax error: operand expected (error token is "== 1 || == 0 ) ") – Cheiron Jan 24 '13 at 21:55

I know this has been answered, but here's mine just because I think case is an under-appreciated tool. (Maybe because people think it is slow, but it's at least as fast as an if, sometimes faster.)

case "$1" in
    0|1) xinput set-prop 12 "Device Enabled" $1 ;;
      *) echo "This script requires a 1 or 0 as first parameter." ;;
esac
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.