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I have an interface

public interface Foo<T> {
    public void bar(String s, T t);
}

I want to write a method

public void baz() {
    String hi = "Hello";
    String bye = "Bye";
    Foo<String> foo = new Foo() {
        public void bar(String s, String t) {
            System.out.println(s);
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    };
    foo.bar(hi,bye);
}

i get an error

<anonymous Test$1> is not abstract and does not override abstract method bar(String,Object) in Foo
    Foo<String> foo = new Foo() {

I'm fairly new to Java, I'm sure this is a simple mistake. how can I write this?

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you are using java 7, Type inference doesn't apply here. You have to provide the Type parameter in the constructor invoking as well.

    Foo<String> foo = new Foo<String>() {
        public void bar(String s, String t) {
            System.out.println(s);
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    };
    foo.bar(hi,bye); 

EDIT: just noticed that you have used new Foo() which is basically a raw type, you have to provide the generic type for your constructor invokation, new Foo<String>()

Related Link

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1  
Except the OP wasn't using the <> operator - he was using raw Foo. –  Paul Bellora Jan 24 '13 at 22:38
    
Are you saying new Foo is the same as new Foo<> in Java 7? I wasn't aware of that. –  Paul Bellora Jan 24 '13 at 23:09
    
nopes, i never said that, they arent the same , new Foo<>(not for anonynymous class's though) would only work in java 7 due to introduction of type inference. –  PermGenError Jan 24 '13 at 23:14
    
@PaulBellora sorry my explanation was vague, edited it now.. :) –  PermGenError Jan 24 '13 at 23:19
1  
Okay cool +1 .. –  Paul Bellora Jan 24 '13 at 23:26
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Foo<String> foo = new Foo<String>() {
  @Override
  public void bar(String s, String t) {
    System.out.println(s);
    System.out.println(s);
  }
};
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You have forgotten one <String>

public void baz() {
    String hi = "Hello";
    String bye = "Bye";
    Foo<String> foo = new Foo<String>() {
        public void bar(String s, String t) {
            System.out.println(s);
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    };
    foo.bar(hi,bye);
}
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Change with below code it compile and run perfectly.

        Foo<String> foo = new Foo<String>() {
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