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So I want to validate a string format. Since my requirements are quite simple, I'm wondering if I could avoid REGEXP or any things like that, and do it "bare metal".

Is is ok to do it that way? Any advice for a better implementation ?

bool Request::checkDate(string date, bool run=false)
{
    if ( (run&&date.length()!=13) || (!run&&date.length()!=10) )  return false;

    bool valid = true;

    valid &= !(date[0] < '0' || date[0] > '9');
    valid &= !(date[1] < '0' || date[1] > '9');
    valid &= !(date[2] < '0' || date[2] > '9');
    valid &= !(date[3] < '0' || date[3] > '9');
    valid &= (date[4] == '-');
    valid &= !(date[5] < '0' || date[5] > '9');
    valid &= !(date[6] < '0' || date[6] > '9');
    valid &= (date[7] == '-');
    valid &= !(date[8] < '0' || date[8] > '9');
    valid &= !(date[9] < '0' || date[9] > '9');

    if (run) {
        valid &= (date[10] == '_');
        valid &= !(date[11] < '0' || date[11] > '9');
        valid &= !(date[12] < '0' || date[12] > '9');
    }

    return valid;
}
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closed as not constructive by ildjarn, Mooing Duck, ChrisF, BЈовић, Björn Kaiser Jan 25 '13 at 10:44

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What do you mean by "OK" and "better"? –  Robert Harvey Jan 24 '13 at 22:10
7  
The C/C++ police should be alerted... –  Lee Taylor Jan 24 '13 at 22:10
3  
Uh, so 9999-99-99 is a valid date? –  us2012 Jan 24 '13 at 22:12
2  
at the very least, use isDigit to check if char is a number... It's standard C library function. –  hyde Jan 24 '13 at 22:17
1  
I like how it's "bare metal" for speed, but makes a local copy of the string for no reason. –  Mooing Duck Jan 24 '13 at 22:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are fine to explicitly describe the validation as you have done.

Your code does do unnecessary work because you're not using short-circuiting.

Consider this version instead. As soon as valid is proven to be false, no more work is done.

bool Request::checkDate(string date, bool run=false)
{
    if ( (run&&date.length()!=13) || (!run&&date.length()!=10) )  return false;

    bool valid = !(date[0] < '0' || date[0] > '9')
       && !(date[1] < '0' || date[1] > '9')
       && !(date[2] < '0' || date[2] > '9')
       && !(date[3] < '0' || date[3] > '9')
       && (date[4] == '-')
       && !(date[5] < '0' || date[5] > '9')
       && !(date[6] < '0' || date[6] > '9')
       && (date[7] == '-')
       && !(date[8] < '0' || date[8] > '9')
       && !(date[9] < '0' || date[9] > '9')

       && ( !run || (
        (date[10] == '_') &&
        !(date[11] < '0' || date[11] > '9') &&
        !(date[12] < '0' || date[12] > '9')
       ) )
    }

    return valid;
}
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IMHO is it fine to use handwritten code but you should replace

!(date[0] < '0' || date[0] > '9')

by

isdigit(date[0])

Why prefer isdigit? There is no downside for using isdigit, and it expresses your intention clearer.

From a performance perspective, I don't expect a regexp to perform any faster than handwritten code. It may very well perform worse, though.

(But, as others have pointed out, your implementation will accept invalid dates such as 9999-99-99. Edit: When you reject it later, it is of course OK.)

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1  
The answer you link to is wrong, '0'..'9' is guaranteed. He probably assumed it wasn't because 'A'-'Z' and 'a'-'z' aren't guaranteed. –  Mooing Duck Jan 24 '13 at 22:38
    
@MooingDuck Thanks, you are right! I fell for the same mistake. –  Philipp Claßen Jan 24 '13 at 22:45
    
Simple use of a regexp will definitely be an order of magnitude slower than this. Precompiled regexp might get close. But for performance, it should be turned to use short-circuiting, as is in another answer. Of Course, unless this is called a million times, this is irrelevant. –  hyde Jan 24 '13 at 22:59

Based on your comments. I think I'll go this one.

bool Request::checkDate(const string& date, bool run=false)
{
    return      ((run&&date.length()==13) || (!run&&date.length()==10))
                && isdigit(date[0])
                && isdigit(date[1])
                && isdigit(date[2])
                && isdigit(date[3])
                && (date[4] == '-')
                && isdigit(date[5])
                && isdigit(date[6])
                && (date[7] == '-')
                && isdigit(date[8])
                && isdigit(date[9])
                && (!run || (
                    (date[10] == '_')
                    && isdigit(date[11])
                    && isdigit(date[12])
                    ));
}
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Better use const string& to make clear that it won't be changed –  BeniBela Jan 24 '13 at 23:00

If you only mean "will it work", then the answer is yes, I suppose it will. If you mean is it well written, then I'd lean a lot more toward "no, not really."

My first concern would be with the interface:

bool Request::checkDate(string date, bool run=false)

At least IMO, passing a bool as a parameter to a function is usually a problem. In a few cases there's a fairly obvious meaning to attach to a bool being passed as a parameter, but consider:

x.checkDate("whatever", true);

vs:

x.checkDate("whatever", false);

To somebody who isn't familiar with checkDate and what that parameter means, is it going to be at all obvious what the difference between these to is? My guess is that for most readers, that's going to be a resounding "no".

So, I think the first thing to do is change that to something more meaningful. Unfortunately, I'm not quite sure what the _99 at the end is supposed to signify, which makes it a little difficult to suggest a meaningful name for the parameter. For the moment, (for lack of a better term) maybe extended will do:

enum class date_types { standard, extended } ;

Now checking a date like:

x.checkDate("whatever", extended);

...at least makes a little bit of sense.

As for the code to the checking itself, I think I'd use something like this:

// warning: untested code.
//

// same general idea as std::all_of
template <class F>
bool assert_all(std::string const &d, std::vector<int> const &subs, F f) { 
    for (size_t i=0; i<subs.size(); ++i)
       if (!f((unsigned char)d[subs[i]]))
           return false;
    return true;
}

bool checkDate(std::string const &date, date_types run = date_types::standard) {
    static const std::vector<int> dashes          {4, 7};
    static const std::vector<int> digits          {0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9};
    static const std::vector<int> extended_digits {11, 12};

    if (!assert_all(date, dashes, [](char ch){return ch == '-';}) &&
         assert_all(date, digits, isdigit)) {
        return false;
    }

    if (run == date_type::extended)
        return (date[10] == '_' && assert_all(date, extended_digits, isdigit);
    return true;
}

I'm not sure assert_all is really the best name there, but you get the general idea (I hope, anyway).

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