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Is it a good idea to process two-dimensional arrays using pointers?

for( p = &a[0][0]; p < &a[N][N]; p++){
    *p = 0;
}

Or is it better to use indexing?

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Do whichever is more comfortable for you, it's probably easier to understand and read when you use indexing but pointers work just fine. –  Jesus Ramos Jan 24 '13 at 22:50
3  
Define what you mean by better? –  rerun Jan 24 '13 at 22:50
1  
Just an aside - Given that the for loop just sets each item in the array to zero, I suspect the code above could be simplified to just be "memset(a, '\0', sizeof(a[0][0])*N*N);" But that doesn't actually answer your question. –  selbie Jan 24 '13 at 22:54
    
Completely subjective and situation dependent. –  Carl Norum Jan 24 '13 at 22:55
    
Note that a major downside of this is that your arrays have to be initialized correctly (one big block of memory instead of N blocks of N elements) for this to work. –  schnaader Jan 24 '13 at 22:57
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closed as not a real question by ChrisF, Nate, John Kugelman, Carl Norum, Eric Jan 25 '13 at 3:15

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way you have denoted your array doesn't guarantee that pointer arithmetic will always work. Given how you've declared your two-dimensional array, it is probably not an issue, but it is certainly not good style.

However, imagine instead the array is allocated dynamically. Something like this:

int **p = malloc(ARR_SIZE * sizeof(*p));
for (i = 0; i < ARR_SIZE; i++) {
    p[i] = malloc(ARR_SIZE * sizeof(**p));
}

This is a two-dimensional array (of sorts), but will not guarantee that allocated memory will be contiguous and hence would break your loop.

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If it's not contiguous in memory it's not a two dimensional array. I agree with the rest, +1. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Jan 24 '13 at 23:14
    
@RamyAlZuhouri Even when it is contiguous in memory, the standard doesn't allow it to be accessed in this manner. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2036104/validity-of-the-code and groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c/msg/… for example. –  Alok Singhal Jan 24 '13 at 23:50
    
I know it, it's contiguous in memory but maybe it's placed in the reverse sence. So that the second array is at loser addresses. My comment didn't imply anything that I haven't said, was a punctualization to say that the thing in the above example isn't an array, just a dinamicly allocated array of pointers to many dinamicly allocated arrays. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Jan 25 '13 at 9:29
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You should alway use indexing, unless you are absolutely sure that you know what you are doing, and have some very good reason why you don't want to use indexing for array

It is much easier to understand and maintain. If someone else is looking at your code it will be easier for them, also it is more resistant to errors. Pointers are great thing, but lot of people use them in wrong way and abuse them, making programs difficult to understand, maintain and find and solve bugs in them. From my professional experience it is much better not to create "magic" with pointers unless you really have to and are absolutely sure that you know what you are doing.

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It is much easier to understand and maintain. If someone else is looking at your code it will be easier for them, also it is more resistant to errors. Pointers are great thing, but lot of people use them in wrong way and abuse them, making programs difficult to understand, maintain and find and solve bugs in them. From my professional experience it is much better not to create "magic" with pointers unless you really have to and are absolutely sure that you know what you are doing. –  Puppet Master 3010 Jan 24 '13 at 22:59
    
it is done, you are right it looks much better now :) –  Puppet Master 3010 Jan 24 '13 at 23:04
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No, it is not as data may not be stored cosecutively (the above code assumes that the first element of a row start exactly after the last element of the previous row).

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1  
Multi-dimensional arrays like this are guaranteed to be contiguous in memory. –  John Kugelman Jan 24 '13 at 23:00
    
a[0] = malloc(sizeof(int*) * N); XYZ = malloc(1024); a[1] = malloc(sizeof(int*) * N); Are you sure a[0][N-1] is exactly before a[1][0] ? –  Paolo Jan 24 '13 at 23:05
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