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Suppose I have a string like this:

> x <- c("16^TG40")

I am trying to get the result c(16 2 40) where the 2 is length(^TG)-1. I am able to find this pattern by, for example:

> gsub("(\\^[ACGT]+)", " \\1 ", x)
[1] "16 ^TG 40"

However, I am unable to replace this string with its length-1 directly. Is there a simpler way of replacing the matched pattern by the length?

After quite a bit of searching (here on SO and google searches), I ended up with stringr package, which I think is awesome. But still, it all boils down to finding the location of this pattern (using str_locate_all) and then replacing the subtring with whatever value one wants (using str_sub). I have over more than 100,000 strings and it is very time consuming (as the pattern may also occur multiple times in the string).

I'm running in parallel at the moment to compensate for the slowness, but I'd be glad to know if this is possible at all directly (or quickly).

Any ideas?

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will all your strings be in a similar pattern of digits-characters-digits? And does your regex currently perform the correct splitting if you ignore the string length portion of your question? –  Justin Jan 24 '13 at 23:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's a base-R approach.

The syntax is far from intuitive but, by hewing closely to this template, you can perform all manner of manipulations and replacements of matched substrings. (See ?gregexpr for some more complicated examples.)

x2 <- x <- c("16^TG40", "16^TGCT40", "16^TG40^GATTACA40")

pat <- "(\\^[ACGT]+)"              ## A pattern matching substrings of interest
modFun <- function(ss) {           ## A function to modify them
    paste0(" ", nchar(ss) - 1, " ")
}

## Use regmatches() <- regmatches(gregexpr()) to search, modify, and replace.
m <- gregexpr(pat, x2)
regmatches(x2, m) <- sapply(regmatches(x2, m), modFun)
x2
## [1] "16 2 40"      "16 4 40"      "16 2 40 7 40"
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Thanks Josh and to others. I did a quick benchmarking on my data and your function runs the fastest (in 5.9 seconds) as opposed to Grothendieck's gsubfn solution which took 12.8 seconds. But, I ran it without tcltk. So, I guess I really can't compare. In anycase, I've gotten quite a few tips here. I'll try to optimise. I wonder(ed), since \\1 already holds the pattern, why isn't it possible to just do a length(.) on it. –  Arun Jan 25 '13 at 0:17
    
I realised a couple of days back that gregexpr also gives the length of the matched pattern.. :) So I used that to replace nchar which provided a significant speed up. Thought it's nice to share. Thanks again Josh. –  Arun Jul 21 '13 at 18:25
1  
@Arun Yeah, that's a good point. I found gregexpr & regmatches a bit awkward at first use, but have since realized that that's largely because they are true power tools. To anyone who needs to use regular expressions and has already invested the effort needed to essentially master them, I'd definitely say, "take one more hour to add these two excellent functions to your toolchest." –  Josh O'Brien Jul 21 '13 at 19:05
1  
(That said, gsubfn and stringr do provide alternative means of accomplishing most of what gregexpr and regmatches do. I just happen to have a general preference for base R solutions, where and when they are available!) –  Josh O'Brien Jul 21 '13 at 19:10

(1) gsubfn The gsubfn statement replaces the ^... part with its length surrounded by spaces and the strapply pulls out the digits from that string and converts them to numeric. Omit the strapply if character output is sufficient.

> library(gsubfn)
> xx <- gsubfn("\\^[ACGT]*", ~ sprintf(" %s ", nchar(x) - 1), x)
> strapply(xx, "\\d+", as.numeric)
[[1]]
[1] 16  2 40

(2) Loop Through Set of Lengths

This assumes that the number of characters in each ACGT sequence is between mn and mx and it just replaces ACGT sequences i long with i using gsub proceeding in a loop. If there are only a few possible lengths there will only be a few iterations so it will be fast but if the strings could have many different lengths it will be slow since more iterations of the loop will be needed. Below we have assumed that the ACGT sequences are 2, 4 or 6 long but these may need to be adjusted. A possible disadvantage of this solution is need to assume a set of possible sequence lengths.

x <- "4^CG5^CAGT656"

mn <- 2
mx <- 6
y <- x
for(i in seq(mn, mx, 2)) {
   pat <- sprintf("\\^[ACGT]{%d}(\\d)", i)
   replacement <- sprintf(" %d \\1", i)
   y <- gsub(pat, replacement, y)
}

(3) Loop through ACGT sequences

This one loops through the ACGT sequences replacing one with its length until none are left. If there are a small number of ACGT sequences it can be fast since few iterations will occur but if there can be many ACGT sequences it will be slow due to the larger number of iterations.

x <- "4^CG5^CAGT656"
y <- x
while(regexpr("^", y, fixed = TRUE) > 0) {
    y <- sprintf("%s %d %s", sub("\\^.*", "", y),
        nchar(sub("^[0-9 ]+\\^([ACGT]+).*", "\\1", y)),
        sub("^[0-9 ]+\\^[ACGT]+", "", y))
}

Benchmark

Here is a benchmark. Note that above in some solutions I converted the strings to numeric (which of course takes extra time) but to make the benchmarks comparable I compared the speed of creating strings without any numeric conversion.

x <- "4^CGT5^CCA656"
library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(order = "relative", replications = 10000,
   columns = c("test", "replications", "relative", "elapsed"),
   regmatch = {
      pat <- "(\\^[ACGT]+)"
      x2 <- x
      m <- gregexpr(pat, x2)
      regmatches(x2, m) <- sapply(regmatches(x2, m), modFun)
      x2
   },
   gsubfn = gsubfn("\\^[ACGT]*", ~ sprintf(" %s ", length(x) - 1), x),
   loop.on.len = {
    mn <- 2
    mx <- 6
    y <- x
    for(i in seq(mn, mx, 2)) {
       pat <- sprintf("\\^[ACGT]{%d}(\\d)", i)
       replacement <- sprintf(" %d \\1", i)
       y <- gsub(pat, replacement, y)
    }
   },
   loop.on.seq = {
    y <- x
    while(regexpr("^", y, fixed = TRUE) > 0) {
        y <- sprintf("%s %d %s", sub("\\^.*", "", y),
            nchar(sub("^[0-9 ]+\\^([ACGT]+).*", "\\1", y)),
            sub("^[0-9 ]+\\^[ACGT]+", "", y))
    }
  }
)

The results are shown below. The two looping solutions were the fastest on the input shown but their performance will vary depending on how many iterations are required so the actual data may make a difference. The loop.on.len solution has the disadvantage that the ACGT lengths must be among the assumed set. The regmatch solution from Josh involves no looping and is fast. gsubfn solution has the advantage that its only one line of code and is particularly direct.

         test replications relative elapsed
4 loop.on.seq        10000    1.000    1.93
3 loop.on.len        10000    1.140    2.20
1    regmatch        10000    1.803    3.48
2      gsubfn        10000    7.145   13.79

UPDATE Have added two looping solutions and removed those solutions previously part of the post that do not handle more than one ACGT sequence (based on comments clarifying the question). Also re-did the benchmarks including only solutions that handle multiple ACGT sequences.

UPDATE Removed one solution that did not work with multiple ^... sequences. It had previously been removed from benchmark but the code had not been removed. Improved explanation in (1).

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Currently gsubfn always uses the R engine so tcltk won't help here. strapplyc is the fastest function in the gsubfn package but I tried a variation based on that and it was faster than the gsubfn solution shown but still slower than all the others. –  G. Grothendieck Jan 25 '13 at 1:36
    
Are the ACGT sequences interspersed with numbers "23^AC23^GT45" or can they be in a row "4^AC^GA5"? Does it always begin and end with a number? Also if its repeated is there a limit to how many times? Can you describe the most general form that could be encountered? Also do you have many of them in a vector or is there just one? –  G. Grothendieck Jan 25 '13 at 23:34
    
Have added 2 looping solutions, removed solutions that did not handle multiple ACGT sequences and redid the benchmarks. –  G. Grothendieck Jan 26 '13 at 15:29

I'm voting for the incredibly slick gsubfn answer, but since I already have this clunky code:

mod <- gsub("(\\^[ACGT]+)", " \\1 ", x)
locs <- gregexpr(" ", mod , fixed=TRUE)[[1]]
paste( substr( x, 1, locs[1]-1), 
       diff(locs)-2, 
       substr(mod, locs[2]+1, nchar(mod) ) , sep=" ")
#[1] "16 2 40"
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