Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a RESTful API, part of which will be checking if a user has a valid subscription. I'm thinking of doing it like this:

GET https://api.example.org/subscriptions/me?username=johndoe&password=abc123&apikey=somekey HTTP/1.1
Host: api.example.org
Accept: application/json

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json

{
    "username": "johndoe",
    "id": 5152,
    "valid": true,
    "valid_until": "2013-01-01 00:00:00",
    "account_level": "basic"
}

The system would return the following status codes:

  • 200 if the user has a valid subscription
  • 400 if the username or password parameters were omitted
  • 401 if the user credentials are invalid
  • 402 if the user doesn't have a valid subscription.
  • 403 if the user's API key is invalid
  • 404 if it's an invalid user
  • 429 if the client has made too many API requests

Is this a RESTful API design? Could it be done better? Is HTTP 403 a good response for invalid API keys?

share|improve this question
    
When you return errors, you can still return json data in the body of the document. That way you can provide more detail to the caller about what went wrong. {code:nnn, message:'Invalid API Key'} –  slashingweapon Jan 25 '13 at 0:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I personally would base everything around the user. The user has a subscription.

I would recommend not passing the password in a GET request. Nobody likes to have a plaintext password stored in their history. You should do a POST /login and set the appropriate session so authentication does not need to happen with each request. If you want it to be completely stateless use basic HTTP authentication.

Request:

GET /users/5152
Accept: application/json
Authorization: Basic QWxhZGRpbjpvcGVuIHNlc2FtZQ==

Response Body:

{
    "username": "johndoe",
    "password": "9b71d224bd62f3785d96d46ad3ea3d73319bfbc2890c"
    "id": 5152,
    "valid": true,
    "valid_until": "2013-01-01 00:00:00",
    "account_level": "basic"
} 

Status Codes:

  • 200 if the user exists. Check the subscript status client side.
  • 401 if the username or password parameters were omitted
  • 401 if the user credentials are invalid
  • --- if the user doesn't have a valid subscription. Error on client side
  • 404 if the user does not exist
  • 429 if the client has made too many API requests
share|improve this answer
    
I like this. Would it be inappropriate to return 402 Payment Required if the user exists but has no subscription? –  Brandon Wamboldt Jan 25 '13 at 0:15
    
Yes. It would be inappropriate because if you are thinking of it as a user entity, you do not need payment to retrieve user information. You need payment to have a valid subscription. If the subscription is not valid, it should be an error client side. –  Michael Boselowitz Jan 25 '13 at 0:19
    
Basic authentication is only secure over HTTPS. Over plain HTTP you must use Digest. –  Nicholas Jan 25 '13 at 13:50
    
Good point. Basic auth is only base 64 encoded, not hashed. So it is vulnerable to the man in the middle. However digest is also susceptible to the same attack and also dictates how passwords are stored on the server, disallowing some stronger hashes. –  Michael Boselowitz Jan 25 '13 at 16:02

sending arbitrary users password hashes to any authenticated user is not really a good idea.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.