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I want the index of some variables in a data-frame, but my grep() skill are insufficient.

Say I have this data frame,

( dfn <- data.frame(
a1   = c(3,  3, 0,  3, 0,   0),
a2   = c(1, NA, 0, NA, 1,   4),
a11  = c(0,  3, NA, 1, 3,   1),
a12  = c(0,  3, NA, 1, 3,   3),
a_12 = c(0,  3, NA, 1, NA, NA),
a_1  = c(12, 3, NA, 1, 4,  NA)) )
  a1 a2 a11 a12 a_12 a_1
1  3  1   0   0    0  12
2  3 NA   3   3    3   3
3  0  0  NA  NA   NA  NA
4  3 NA   1   1    1   1
5  0  1   3   3   NA   4
6  0  4   1   3   NA  NA

Now, what I want is to grep a1, a2, a11, and a12 (in real life the # after the a' is a consecutive list from 1 to 12), how do I do that? I've tried the two grep's below, but with no luck.

foo <- grep('a[1:12]$', names(dfn) )
names(dfn[,foo])
[1] "a1" "a2"

I've also tried this,

bar <- grep('a[c(1:12)]$', names(dfn) )
names(dfn[,bar])
[1] "a1" "a2"

What I want is

[1] "a1" "a2" "a11" "a12"

Secondly, can anyone direct me to a good grep() tutorial? Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

you need grep('a[1:12]+', names(dfn))

actually the proper way to do it would be grep('a[1-9]+', names(dfn)) the + after the [1-9] means that values from 1-9 can be repeated any number of times after the a but must appear at least once.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Short and sweet. – Eric Fail Jan 25 '13 at 1:08
1  
what if you have a1111 for example... – agstudy Jan 25 '13 at 1:18
    
You answered my question, but I ended up using @thelatemail's answer as I realized that my data had some variables a1_a, a2_b a12_l that I also need to sort out. I tried adding a $ after the + in your code, but couldn't solve it that way. regardless, I appreciate your answer! – Eric Fail Jan 25 '13 at 1:19
    
@agstudy, good point. Please see my comment above. – Eric Fail Jan 25 '13 at 1:20
    
@EricFail you MUST/should check the correct answer to the exact question...since questions and answers will be used by others after..of course with my respects to all the persons here how tried to answer. – agstudy Jan 25 '13 at 1:24
regmatches(names(dfn),regexpr('a[1-9]{1,2}',names(dfn)))
[1] "a1"  "a2"  "a11" "a12"

my regular expression is : a follwed by min =1 and max =2 numbers in the set [1-9]

share|improve this answer

You could just do this instead:

names(dfn)[names(dfn) %in% paste0("a",1:12)]
[1] "a1"  "a2"  "a11" "a12"

If you want the indexes, this will give you that:

which(names(dfn) %in% paste0("a",1:12))
[1] 1 2 3 4
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your elaborate answer, but I am curious to know if there is any advantages to the answer already provided by @CAPSLOCK? – Eric Fail Jan 25 '13 at 1:06
    
Thanks for the update, I am looking for the index positions and not the names. – Eric Fail Jan 25 '13 at 1:21
    
@EricFail - see the edit. – thelatemail Jan 25 '13 at 1:23
    
Beautiful, thanks. Don't you like/use paste0()? If so I am curious to learn why. – Eric Fail Jan 25 '13 at 1:25
    
@EricFail - I am using a portable version of R on a memory stick that is at version 2.14, paste0 doesn't exist when I am checking code. I've got nothing against it. – thelatemail Jan 25 '13 at 1:27

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