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If I have condensed an AppleScript into one line, how can I encapsulate it to run in an echo system call from a C program? All the formatting I have tried result in errors: (single quotes, double quotes, various brackets, etc...)

In case it isn't clear, I have a C program that uses fgets() to capture input. When I try to echo in a system command, like echo ' && foo bar && $? ' it generally works. But if I want to echo in an AppleScript directly, I can't seem to get the formatting down. Any ideas?

FWIW here is what I'm trying:

echo ' && "osascript -e 'tell application "Terminal"' -e 'do script "foo bar"' -e 'end tell'" && $?'

The above example echoes everything contained within the single quotes and "prints" it, but doesn't execute it. I have tried many variations on quotes, etc, to no avail. Also, between osascript ... 'end tell' works when run directly in the terminal.

Any help is appreciated!

EDIT

Here is a snippet of the C code:

    char comment[80];
    char cmd[120];
    fgets(comment, 80, stdin);
    sprintf(cmd, "echo '%s %s' >> reports.log", comment, now());
    system(cmd);

Edit Two... changed title to be more accurate

share|improve this question
    
Could you post a runnable example rather than foo bar? – Josh Caswell Jan 25 '13 at 2:49
    
Sure. Pretty much any bash script will work it seems... echo ' && pwd && $? ' is a simple one that works through my C program. Similarly echo && pwd && $? works directly into the terminal. – d0rmLife Jan 25 '13 at 2:55
    
@JoshCaswell Oh, and for the AppleScript something like this will work in the terminal: echo && osascript -e 'tell application "Terminal"' -e 'do script "pwd"' -e 'end tell' ... obviously I can't get it to work with echo through the program – d0rmLife Jan 25 '13 at 2:58
    
How are you including that in your C code? – Josh Caswell Jan 25 '13 at 2:59
    
In case it isn't obvious, in the first example, it is made successful for the C program by encapsulating it in single quotes... this does not work in the AppleScript version. – d0rmLife Jan 25 '13 at 3:00

Ok! Based on your comments, I would rewrite your question something like this:

How to trick system("echo %s") into running AppleScript?

I'm trying to push the limits of system() to understand why it is important to be careful with its use in C. This sample program is presented in a book on C:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char* now() {
    return "yyyy-mm-dd";
}

int main() {
    char comment[80];
    char cmd[120];
    fgets(comment, 80, stdin);
    sprintf(cmd, "echo '%s %s' >> reports.log", comment, now());
    return system(cmd);
}

I can "echo out" of the program and execute most bash scripts with the program by typing ' && pwd && '. Now I want to figure out how to do something similar, but by using AppleScript instead of bash. I’m trying this:

' && "osascript -e 'tell application "Terminal"' -e 'do script "foo bar"' -e 'end tell'" && '

The osascript ... 'end tell' command works when run directly in the terminal, but it’s not executing properly. I have tried many variations on quotes, etc, to no avail.

Then, my answer would be the following:


To make it easier to debug exactly what command is being run, let’s echo the command to the terminal:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char* now() {
    return "yyyy-mm-dd";
}

int main() {
    char comment[80];
    char cmd[120];
    fgets(comment, 80, stdin);
    sprintf(cmd, "echo '%s %s' >> reports.log", comment, now());

    /* for debugging */
    printf("executing %s\n", cmd);

    return system(cmd);
}

Now let’s try it out:

$ gcc -c prog.c -o prog
$ ./prog
' && osascript -e 'tell application "Terminal"' -e 'do script "date"' -e 'end tell'" && '
executing echo '' && osascript -e 'tell application "Terminal"' -e 'do script "date"' -e 'end t yyyy-mm-dd' >> reports.log

Huh! It somehow got cut off as end t instead of end tell'" && '. Wait, how big is the input buffer? 80 characters? That’s the problem! The AppleScript command you’re trying is syntactically correct, but is too long for the input buffer and is getting chopped off.

Eliminating all whitespace and using a little-known bash feature to embed the newlines, I can just barely squeeze that AppleScript into 77 characters:

'&&osascript -e$'tell application "Terminal"\ndo script "date"\nend tell'&& '

Since the 80-character buffer needs a null-terminator at the end, it really only has room for 79 characters. So with this particular AppleScript command you can run shell commands in terminal up to 6 characters long…


My answer to what I thought was your original question—how to call a multi-line AppleScript from C—remains:


Command-line arguments can have newlines in them. You can run an entire AppleScript from bash like this:

$ osascript -e '
tell application "Terminal"
    do script "date"
end tell'

bash pauses waiting for the closing ', and then passes the whole script as a single argument.

You can do something similar in C, just with a bit more quoting:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    system("osascript -e '\n"
            "tell application \"Terminal\"\n"
            "   do script \"date\"\n"
            "end tell'\n");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The flexibility that fgets() offers is rather convenient--I can pass a number of bash arguments with the same program. While reworking my program to format input and then send it as a system() call is definitely a possibility, I was hoping for a simple solution in encapsulating AppleScript in echo, as I am able to do for bash with echo... Do you know of a way to capture AppleScript with echo as I can for bash commands? – d0rmLife Jan 25 '13 at 4:02
    
I’m sorry, but I’m having trouble understanding exactly what you’re trying to do. Are you just trying to append the comment from fgets() and a timestamp to reports.log? For that you can do FILE* reports = fopen("reports.log", "a"); fprintf(reports, "%s %s\n", comment, now()); fclose(reports); and skip system() and echo entirely. – andrewdotn Jan 25 '13 at 4:20
    
No, I'm trying to push the limits of system() to understand why it is important to be careful with its use in C. This exercise is presented in a book on C. I can "echo out" of the program and execute most bash scripts with the program, and I want to figure out how to do something similar, but by using AppleScript instead of bash. Thus the various examples of bash working and AppleScript not working. The basic question--at this point--is how can I encapsulate AppleScript into the fgets() via terminal input so I can echo into the terminal and execute AppleScript. – d0rmLife Jan 25 '13 at 4:27
    
This is clearer: the book has an exercise to "abuse" system() to understand how to be careful with its use in C programming. I can "echo out" of the program when it asks for input via fgets() by using something similar to one of the examples above. However, I can only do this successfully with bash commands. I am curious if it can be done with AppleScript, which necessitates incapsulating the AppleScript into fgets(), system(), echo etc. I cannot get an echo to execute an AppleScript in this fashion, but echoing an AppleScript can be done directly into the terminal from ~$ ... – d0rmLife Jan 25 '13 at 4:34
    
... so I am thinking it is simply a syntax error, because I have to capture the "echo out" with single quotes, and I think this conflicts with the use of single quotes in AppleScript. At least, that is my guess. – d0rmLife Jan 25 '13 at 4:35

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