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i am having a lot of troubles understanding the bubble sort. Here is some code that i need to analyze but i am having a lot of troubles. I am fine with the generating of random strings and integars its just the sorting part that confuses me. Can you take me step by step of how the sorting happens.

/**
 *bubble Sort method
 *with strings and numbers
 *randomly generated
 *
 *mr marco
 *
 */
import java.io.*;

public class bubblessorts {

    /**
     * Creates a new instance of <code>bubblessorts</code>.
     */
    static int[] numbers1=new int[40];
    static int[] numbers2=new int[40];

    static String[] str1= new String[40];


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO code application logic here4
        //
        //bubble sort with random number
        //
        //

        numbers1=nums(10,1000);
        prints(numbers1);
       // numbers2=numbers1;
      //  numbers3=numbers1;
        bubbleSort1(numbers1);
        prints(numbers1);

        prints(numbers2);
        numbers2=nums(1,780000);
        bubbleSort2(numbers2);
        prints(numbers2);


        //
        // bubble sort wwith random strings

        str1=manyStr();
        printsTr(str1);
        bubbleSort1Str(str1);
        printsTr(str1);

    }

    public static void prints(int[] nump)
    {
        System.out.println();
        for (int i=0; i <nump.length; i++)
            System.out.print(nump[i]+"   ");
        System.out.println();
    }
    public static void printsTr(String[] nump)
    {
        System.out.println();
        for (int i=0; i <nump.length; i++)
            System.out.print(nump[i]+"   ");
        System.out.println();
    }
    public static int[] nums(int minimum, int maximum)
    {
        int[] n=new int[40];
        for (int i=0; i < 40; i++){
            n[i] = minimum + (int)(Math.random()*maximum);
        }
        return n;

    }

}



    public static String[] manyStr()
    {

        String[] words=new String[40];
        for(int i=0; i< 40; i++)
            words[i]=Create_String();
        return(words);

    }


    //
    // create a ramdom string of length 8
    //

   public static String Create_String()  
  {  
    final int PASSWORD_LENGTH = 8;  
    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();  
    for (int x = 0; x < PASSWORD_LENGTH; x++)  
    {  
      sb.append((char)((int)(Math.random()*26)+97));  
    }  
    return(sb.toString());  
  }  


}




public static int[] bubble(int array[]) {
        int length = array.length;
        for (int pass = 1; pass <= length; pass++) {
            for (int current = 0; current < length - pass; current++) {
                if (array[current] > array[current + 1]) {
                    int temp = array[current];
                    array[current] = array[current + 1];
                    array[current + 1] = temp;

                }
            }
        }
        return array;
    }
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closed as not a real question by Oliver Charlesworth, Mitch Wheat, Lawrence Dol, A--C, Eric Jan 25 '13 at 3:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Did you try e.g. the Wikipedia article? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 25 '13 at 1:53
    
Once you understand it: Never use it! –  Mitch Wheat Jan 25 '13 at 1:53
    
Where is your code for the sort??? –  Hot Licks Jan 25 '13 at 1:54
    
you don't need the code here! –  Tom Carchrae Jan 25 '13 at 1:54
    
Follow this link ---> Bubble sort and Bubble Sort Algorithm. This will help you in your understanding. –  Smit Jan 25 '13 at 1:55

2 Answers 2

Why not check out the Wikipedia article?

Do you have a debugger? Most IDEs include one. Stepping through algorithms line-by-line is one of the best ways to get an understanding of what's happening.

Here's a GIF from the Wikipedia article which you may find helpful:

Bubble Sort

share|improve this answer

This is a good visual/aural explanation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8g-iYGHpEA

share|improve this answer
    
I think the gif on wikipedia is a good enough example. –  shuangwhywhy Jan 25 '13 at 2:03
    
yeah, but hearing the algorithm is kind of neat too. (in case you didn't have the sound turned on) –  Tom Carchrae Jan 25 '13 at 18:32

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