Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use directX's D3DXQuaternionRotationMatrix() function to retrieve the rotation quaternion from a matrix. The matrix was generated by Blender (an open-source 3D graphics environment ) and is used to reorient a mesh object for use in DirectX. The problem is that the above function only returns a "w" value in the quaternion. Here is matrix followed by function:

D3DXMATRIX mA;
._11 = 1;
._12 = 0;
._13 = 0;
._14 = 0;
._21 = 0;
._22 = 0;
._23 = 1;
._24 = 0;
._31 = 0;
._32 = 1;
._33 = 0;
._34 = 0;
._41 = 0;
._42 = 0;
._43 = 0;
._44 = 1;

D3DXQUATERNION qA;
D3DXQuaternionRotationMatrix( &qA, &mA );
D3DXQuaternionConjugate( &qA, &qA );

result:

qA.x = 
qA.y = 
qA.z = 0;
qA.w = 0.707

This quaternion doesn't represent any rotation...the matrix, however, does have rotation...what is this rotation? why doesn't the function provide an accurate result?

share|improve this question
    
Why is your rotation matrix 4x4? Every experience I've had with a "rotation" matrix is that it's 3x3: roll pitch and yaw, three Euler angles, etc. –  John Jan 25 '13 at 2:22
    
it comes from an export script written by Blender developers...the fourth row (._41->._44) is translation data...its a transformation matrix... –  P. Avery Jan 25 '13 at 2:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your matrix:

1; 0; 0; 0;
0; 0; 1; 0;
0; 1; 0; 0;
0; 0; 0; 1;

This is identity matrix with y and z swapped: Your scene is either Y-Up or Z-Up, and Blender expects D3D to be the opposite, so it uses this matrix to swap y and z. You can think of it as a rotation if you want to, but end result is the same.

share|improve this answer
    
the D3DXMatrixDecompose() function does not provide a result because the matrix is not affine... –  P. Avery Jan 31 '13 at 5:15

The W of a quaternion represents the rotation in radians. The X, Y and Z portions represent the axis the rotation is about. In your example the Matrix is rotating around (0,0,0) by .707 radians or ~40.5 degrees.

Edit:

If you are looking for the Yaw, Pitch and Roll you can extract it from the quaternion: http://sunday-lab.blogspot.com/2008/04/get-pitch-yaw-roll-from-quaternion.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.