Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a module Routines.pm:

package Routines;
use strict;
use Exporter;

sub load_shortest_path_matrices {
  my %predecessor_matrix = shift;
  my %shortestpath_matrix = shift;
  ...
}

From another script I call the the sub in the module, passing in arguments which happen to have the same name:

use Routines;
use strict;

my %predecessor_matrix = ();
my %shortestpath_matrix =();  
&Routines::load_shortest_path_matrices($predecessor_matrix, $shortestpath_matrix);

However, this doesn't compile and I get

Global symbol "$predecessor_matrix" requires explicit package name

type of errors. Is it not possible to give the same name to variables in different scopes like this in Perl? (I'm from a C background)

share|improve this question
3  
As zou can tell Perl is different than C, despite the misleading similarities in keywords. My advice is to go buy & read "Learning Perl" to learn the way Perl "thinks". –  lexu Sep 20 '09 at 17:17
    
"use diagnostics;" would help –  Alexandr Ciornii Sep 21 '09 at 11:35
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

$predecessor_matrix is a scalar and %predecessor_matrix is a hash. Different types in Perl (scalar, array, hash, function, and filehandle) have different entries in the symbol table, and, therefore, can have the same name.

Also, you have a problem in your function. It expects to be able to get two hashes from @_, but a hash in list context (such as in the argument list of a function) yields a list of key value pairs. So, both %predecessor_matrix and %shortestpath_matrix will wind up in the %predecessor_matrix of the function. What you need to do here is to use references:

package Routines;
use strict;
use Exporter;

sub load_shortest_path_matrices {
    my $predecessor_matrix  = shift;
    my $shortestpath_matrix = shift;
    $predecessor_matrix->{key} = "value";
    ...
}

and

use Routines;
use strict;

my %predecessor_matrix; 
my %shortestpath_matrix;  
Routines::load_shortest_path_matrices(
    \%predecessor_matrix,
    \%shortestpath_matrix
);

However, passing in structures to load as arguments is more C-like than Perl-like. Perl can return more than one value, so it is more common to see code like:

package Routines;
use strict;
use Exporter;

sub load_shortest_path_matrices {
    my %predecessor_matrix;
    my %shortestpath_matrix;
    ...
    return \%predecessor_matrix, \%shortestpath_matrix;
}

and

use Routines;
use strict;

my ($predecessor_matrix, $shortestpath_matrix) =
    Routines::load_shortest_path_matrices();

for my $key (keys %$predecessor_matrix) {
    print "$key => $predecessor_matrix->{$key}\n";
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

you are declaring the hash %predecessor_matrix but are trying to pass the scalar $predecessor_matrix. The hash exists, the scalar doesn't.

Maybe you want to pass references to the hashes?

Routines::load_shortest_path_matrices(\%predecessor_matrix, \%shortestpath_matrix);


Here's another way to code it:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Routines;

my $predecessor_matrix = {};
my $shortestpath_matrix ={};  
Routines::load_shortest_path_matrices(  $predecessor_matrix
                                       , $shortestpath_matrix
                                      );


package Routines;
use strict;
use Exporter;

sub load_shortest_path_matrices {
  my $predecessor_matrix = shift;
  my $shortestpath_matrix = shift;
  ...
}

you can access the contents of the hashes like this

my $foobar=$shortestpath_matrix->{FOOBAR};
share|improve this answer
6  
Ditch the &, it is unnecessary in this context and can cause problems in others. Never use the & prefix to a function called unless you know what it does and why you want to use it. –  Chas. Owens Sep 20 '09 at 17:17
    
thanks, you are right, I missed that cut & pasting the Suan's code. –  lexu Sep 20 '09 at 17:28
    
@Chas. Owens - beg to differ; there's nothing wrong (and sometimes something right) with consistently using &, so long as you also use () even when there are no args. –  ysth Sep 21 '09 at 4:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.