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I have a 6 * 6 matrix

A=
  3     8     8     8     8     8
  4     6     1     0     7    -1
  9     7     0     2     6    -1
  7     0     0     5     4     4
  4    -1     0     2     8     1
  1    -1     0     8     3     9

I am interested in finding row and column number of neighbors starting from A(4,4)=5. But They will be linked to A(4,4) as neighbor only if A(4,4) has element 4 on right, 6 on left, 2 on top, 8 on bottom 1 on top left diagonally, 3 on top right diagonally, 7 on bottom left diagonally and 9 on bottom right diagonally. TO be more clear A(4,4) will have neighbors if the neighbors are surrounding A(4,4) as follows:

 1     2     3;
 6     5     4;
 7     8     9;

And this will continue as each neighbor is found. Also 0 and -1 will be ignored. In the end I want to have these cells' row and column number as shown in figure below. Is there any way to visualize this network as well. This is sample only. I really have a huge matrix.

enter image description here

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2  
and what have you tried? –  natan Jan 25 '13 at 4:16
    
how the 7s( green colored in the image) can satisfy your conditions. they are neither at bottom nor diagonal A(4, 1). Can you clarify... –  noufal Jan 25 '13 at 9:01
    
A(2,3) has diagonal element A(3,2) which has value 7, so it is a neighbor.Again A(3,2 )has diagonal element A(4,1 ) which has value 7, so it is also a neighbor. In this way they are linked. –  NEPASH Jan 25 '13 at 16:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
A = [3     8     8     8     8     8;
     4     6     1     0     7    -1;
     9     7     0     2     6    -1;
     7     0     0     5     4     4;
     4    -1     0     2     8     1;
     1    -1     0     8     3     9];

test = [1 2 3; 
        6 5 4; 
        7 8 9];

%//Pad A with zeros on each side so that comparing with test never overruns the boundries    
%//BTW if you have the image processing toolbox you can use the padarray() function to handle this
P = zeros(size(A) + 2);        
P(2:end-1, 2:end-1) = A;

current = zeros(size(A) + 2);
past = zeros(size(A) + 2);

%//Initial state (starting point)
current(5,5) = 1; %//This is A(4,4) but shifted up 1 because of the padding

condition = 1;

while sum(condition(:)) > 0;
      %//get the coordinates of any new values added to current
     [x, y] = find(current - past); 
     %//update past to last iterations current
     past = current; 

     %//loop through all the coordinates returned by find above
     for ii=1:size(x); 

         %//Make coord vectors that represent the current coordinate plus it 8 immediate neighbours.
         %//Note that this is why we padded the side in the beginning, so if we hit a coordinate on an edge, we can still get 8 neighbours for it!
         xcoords = x(ii)-1:x(ii)+1; 
         ycoords = y(ii)-1:y(ii)+1; 

         %//Update current based on comparing the coord and its neighbours against the test matrix, be sure to keep the past found points hence the OR
         current(xcoords, ycoords) = (P(xcoords, ycoords) == test) | current(xcoords, ycoords); 

     end 

     %//The stopping condition is when current == past
     condition = current - past;

 end 

%//Strip off the padded sides
FinalAnswer = current(2:end-1, 2:end-1)
[R, C] = find(FinalAnswer);
coords = [R C] %//This line is unnecessary, it just prints out the results at the end for you.

OK cool you got very close, so here is the final solution with the loops. It runs in about 0.002 seconds so it's pretty quick I think. The output is

FinalAnswer =

     0     0     0     0     0     0
     0     1     1     0     0     0
     0     1     0     1     0     0
     1     0     0     1     1     1
     0     0     0     0     1     0
     0     0     0     0     0     1


coords =

     4     1
     2     2
     3     2
     2     3
     3     4
     4     4
     4     5
     5     5
     4     6
     6     6
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Thanks Dan. Will give a shot –  NEPASH Jan 25 '13 at 17:09
    
But this is not picking A(4,6) and A(2,2), A(2,3) –  NEPASH Jan 27 '13 at 3:27
    
It finds all of them, the greens included. It definitely finds A(2,2), A(4,6) and A(2,3). Are you sure you are looping through all the x and y values from the [x, y] = find(current - past) ? The only problem I have found just running it now is that you will have dimension problems around the boundaries. The easiest way to solve this is too pad with zeros. I'll edit my answer. But it most certainly works. –  Dan Jan 28 '13 at 6:18
    
This solution is correct, for your example case it finds all yellow and green elements after 4 iterations. But and I stress this, you have to loop through the x and y variables. I have not made this for loop, you need to do it yourself. So two loops, a while loop that check that past and current differ and then a for loop to go through all the x, y pairs that find() returns! –  Dan Jan 28 '13 at 6:36
    
Ok i am not getting through this. P = padarray(A, [1 1]); current = zeros(size(A) + 2); past = zeros(size(A) + 2); But I am not current(5,5) = 1; while (current-past)==1; [x, y] = find(current - past); past = current; for i=1:size(x); for j=1:size(y); xcoords = x-1:x+1; ycoords = y-1:y+1; current(xcoords(i), ycoords(j)) = ... (P(xcoords, ycoords) == testi) | current(xcoords, ycoords); end end end FinalAnswer = current(2:end-1, 2:end-1); [R, C] = find(FinalAnswer); I can't even think where the error lies. Shame on me:( –  NEPASH Jan 29 '13 at 6:17

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