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Im a little puzzled about this behaviour. Can Anyone Explain

  void Decrement(int* x){
        *x--; //using this line, the output is 5 

        //*x=*x-1; //using this l ine, the output is 4

    }

    int main(){
        int myInt=5;
        Decrement(&myInt);
        cout<<myInt<<endl;
        return 0;
    }

    Output: 5
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2  
Just for the record: use references, not pointers! –  Ulrich Eckhardt Jan 25 '13 at 6:16
    
@doomster: that's a personal preference. I don't like non-const references. I like seeing the & at the call site which makes it clear that the value will be modified. –  StilesCrisis Jan 25 '13 at 6:18
    
This has to be a dupe, right? –  Carl Norum Jan 25 '13 at 6:18
1  
I was learning about pointers, hence, the use of pointers. I know it can be done by reference but I was playing around with pointers. –  Scott Moniz Jan 25 '13 at 19:10
    
Actually, I understand that the "&" makes it clear what's going on. C# adds a keyword to document that you are intentionally passing in a reference. Concerning the rationale for my choice, I prefer references because it makes clear that they must not be null, which is always a question with pointers. That said, this code should look like int const myInt = prev(5);, i.e. use the return value when it has to return something. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Jan 25 '13 at 20:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

*x-- means *(x--). That is, your program modifies x, not what it points to. Since it's passed by value, that modification has no effect in main(). To match your commented line, you'd need to use (*x)--.

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+1 for a correct answer within 120 sec –  Edmund Moshammer Jan 25 '13 at 6:18
1  
It appears that on another question, you commented “Why is it undefined? He never dereferences the bad pointer. Is simply creating it bad enough?”. x-- is indeed undefined if x is a pointer to the very beginning of an object. In C++, the reason is in 5.7:5. –  Pascal Cuoq Jan 25 '13 at 6:37
    
@PascalCuoq: No, it is not. Incrementing or decrementing a pointer (to an array) beyond its end doesn't invoke undefined behavior. Only dereferencing does. That is, int a[10]; int *p = a + 100; ++p; p--; p+=100; is perfectly fine. It invokes UB only if you attempt to dereference p. So *p or p[0] is UB. –  Nawaz Jan 25 '13 at 6:49
    
It might very well be UB in the strictest sense. I'm having a hard time coming up with an example where it would be a problem, though. –  Carl Norum Jan 25 '13 at 6:52
    
@Nawaz n1905, 5.7:7, “… otherwise, the behavior is undefined.” I provided the reference the first time. Did you look at it before commenting? –  Pascal Cuoq Jan 25 '13 at 6:55

Try (*x)--;.

Your code is decrementing the pointer, then dereferencing that and discarding the value.

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You are expecting (*x)-- and are getting *(x--). The reason is Precedence of Operations. Look it up. pre and post increment bind before "dereference address".

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You are basically passing a pointer x by value. As a result of which changes on x (and not in what it point to) in the void Decrement(int*) function doesn't reflect in the main(). This code will achieve what you intended to do:

void Decrement(int& x)
    {
        x--;

    }

int main()
    {
        int myInt=5;
        Decrement(myInt);
        cout<<myInt<<endl;
        return 0;
    }

    Output: 4

This is call by reference by which the reference(or address) to the variable is passed.

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This is an operator precedence problem.

The -- operator is taking precedence over the dereference operator (*). Therefore what you're actually doing is merely accessing the value at one memory location below the location of x (and doing nothing with it).

What I sense you probably want to do is to pass x "by reference". That would look like this:

void Decrement(int& x){
    x--;
}

int main(){
    int myInt = 5;
    Decrement(myInt);
    cout << myInt << endl;
    return 0;
}

When you pass a value by reference, C++ automatically dereferences the pointer for you, which is why the * is no longer needed in the Decrement function.

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@qPCR4vir Ah sorry, fixed it. –  Someuser Jan 26 '13 at 8:30

The expression *x-- is equivalent to *(x--).

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